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Prince Charles isolating after testing positive for COVID-19

Prince Charles has tested positive for COVID-19, his office said on Thursday, the second time that the heir to the throne has contracted the disease.

Charles said in December he and Camilla had both received booster shots

Prince Charles, seen in this photo from late January, is isolating after testing positive for COVID-19 for a second time. (Adrian Dennis/Reuters)

Prince Charles has tested positive for COVID-19, his office said on Thursday, the second time that the heir to the throne has contracted the disease.

Charles, 73, had been due to attend an event in Winchester, in southwestern England, to mark the 70th anniversary of the accession of his mother, Queen Elizabeth, and was "deeply disappointed" he could no longer attend, his office said.

"This morning, the Prince of Wales has tested positive for COVID-19 and is now self-isolating," Clarence House said in a statement on Twitter.

Britain's Press Association news agency reported that Charles recently met with his mother, but said the monarch was not displaying any symptoms.

On Wednesday, the prince attended a reception for the British Asian Trust where pictures showed him chatting to other guests, including British Finance Minister Rishi Sunak. Health Minister Sajid Javid and Interior Minister Priti Patel were also among those who were due to attend.

Charles, who said in December both he and his wife Camilla had received their COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, previously tested positive for the virus in March 2020 when he said he had been "lucky" to have suffered only mild symptoms.

He spent seven days in self-isolation at his Birkhall home in Scotland before resuming his duties. Charles's son Prince William also contracted COVID-19 shortly after his father in 2020.

Camilla was still performing engagements in London on Thursday. She said she was "very, very honoured" and "very touched" by Elizabeth publicly stating her desire that Charles's second wife should become Queen Consort when he becomes king.

With a file from The Associated Press

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