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Pakistan says it has arrested dozens of militants in the wake of Kashmir attack

Pakistan's Interior Ministry says authorities have arrested dozens of suspects, including the brother of the leader of the outlawed Jaish-e-Mohammad group that India has blamed for the Feb. 14 suicide bombing in Indian Kashmir that killed 40 troops.

Indian officials defend their claims the military killed scores of militants

Pakistani soldiers patrol on Feb. 27 in the area where Indian planes launched a pre-dawn airstrike inside Pakistan that India said targeted a terrorist training camp, in Jaba, near Balakot. Pakistan said Tuesday it had arrested over 40 people as part of its investigation. (Aqeel Ahmed/Associated Press)

Pakistan's Interior Ministry says authorities have arrested dozens of suspects, including the brother of the leader of the outlawed Jaish-e-Mohammad group that India has blamed for the Feb. 14 suicide bombing in Indian Kashmir that killed 40 troops.

The bombing last month triggered a dangerous escalation that last week pushed Pakistan and India close to an all-out war over Kashmir.

In Tuesday's statement, the ministry said 44 suspects were arrested, including prominent members of the outlawed militant group. Among them was Mufti Abdul Rauf, brother of the group's leader, Masood Azhar.

The ministry said the brother was among suspects listed in a file on the February bombing that India gave to Pakistan over the weekend. Kashmir is split between Pakistan and India, and is claimed by both in its entirety.

India responded to the Feb. 14 attack by sending fighter jets into Pakistan territory and launching airstrikes on a suspected Jaish-e-Mohammad training camp.

Some Indian opposition leaders had been raising doubts about the government's official claims that a "very large number" of members of the group were killed in the strike by Indian warplanes early on Feb. 26. The government has rejected the demand for proof.

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Indian Interior Minister Rajnath Singh on Tuesday pointed to a government surveillance program that detected about 300 mobile phones at the area of the militant camp that are no longer active.

Pakistan has said the Indian bombs hit a largely empty hillside near the northeastern town of Balakot without hurting anyone.

With files from Reuters