World·Video

Obama questions 'crazy' gun control system — for the 15th time

In the aftermath of Sunday's massacre in an Orlanda, Fla., nightclub, U.S. President Barack Obama is calling on the nation to do some soul-searching about gun control — a speech he's made many times before following mass shootings during his presidency.

'The NRA and the gun control folks say that, oh, Obama doesn't want to talk about terrorism,' president says

More than 7 mass shootings occurred during his presidency 1:37

In the aftermath of Sunday's massacre in an Orlando, Fla., nightclub, U.S. President Barack Obama is calling on the nation to rethink gun control policies — a speech he's made 14 times before following mass shootings over the course of his presidency. 

"The fact that we make it this challenging for law enforcement, for example, even to get alerted that somebody who they are watching has purchased a gun — and if they do get alerted, sometimes it's hard for them to stop them from getting a gun — is crazy," Obama said on Monday. "It's a problem. And we have to, I think, do some soul-searching."

But the president is well aware of the backlash such remarks create.  

"The danger here is, is that then it ends up being the usual political debate," he said. "And the [National Rifle Association] and the gun control folks say that, oh, Obama doesn't want to talk about terrorism. And if you talk about terrorism, then people say why aren't you looking at issues of gun control?"

The Orlando attack prompted the 15th speech Obama has made following mass shootings in the U.S. The video above shows excerpts of his speeches after seven of those tragedies. 

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