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NYPD detective caught on video berating Uber driver reassigned

A New York police detective was transferred from the department's elite Joint Terrorism Task Force on Wednesday after a video showing him screaming at an Uber driver over an alleged traffic violation went viral online, police said.

'No good cop should watch that without a wince,' NYPD commissioner said of video

A New York police detective was transferred from the department's elite Joint Terrorism Task Force on Wednesday after a video showing him screaming at an Uber driver over an alleged traffic violation went viral online, police said.

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton said in a statement the detective, whom he did not identify, was placed on modified assignment and transferred following an internal investigation.

"No good cop should watch that without a wince. Because all good cops know that officer just made their jobs a little bit harder," Bratton said in a statement.

The officer, named by the New York Times as Patrick Cherry, can be seen in the video of the Monday incident unleashing an expletive-laden tirade against the driver over alleged vehicle and parking violations.

He also questioned for how long the driver had been in the country and insulted the man's accent.

"The only reason you're not in handcuffs going to jail ... is because I have things to do," the officer yells. "This isn't important enough for me. You're not important enough."

The three-and-a-half minute video appeared to have been captured by a passenger in the car, who commiserated with the driver when the officer had stepped away.

"Listen, it's not your fault," the passenger says. "I think he's just on a power trip right now."

The case was referred to the city's Civilian Complaint Review Board for further investigation and potential discipline, the police statement said.

The New York Times reported that city officials said Cherry had been named in a dozen previous complaints to the oversight board dating back to 2001, with some alleging the same type of behaviour.

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