World

Nova Scotians celebrate royal wedding

While some Nova Scotians got dressed up and attended parties to mark the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, at least one couple in Halifax was just as happy watching the nuptials unfold on TV in their pyjamas.
Prince William and his wife, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, walk up the aisle after their wedding ceremony in Westminster Abbey on Friday. William will also be known as Earl of Strathearn and Baron Carrickfergus and Kate as Countess of Strathearn and Baroness Carrickfergus. (David Jones/Reuters)

While some Nova Scotians got dressed up and attended parties to mark the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, at least one couple in Halifax was just as happy watching the nuptials unfold on TV in their pyjamas.

Charles and Jane Westropp, who live on London Street in Halifax, woke up early to watch the couple exchanging vows at Westminster Abbey — part of an estimated two billion worldwide television viewers who watched.

"He's wearing his admiral of the fleets uniform," said Charles Westropp at he watched Prince Charles arrive at the abbey with his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall.

Westropp, a retired commodore with the Canadian navy, has met Prince Charles and the Queen. He spent the morning scanning the crowd on television for familiar faces.

"I'm looking to see all my chums in London," Westropp said, laughing.

Jane Westropp said the early morning coffee and the cheering crowds take her back to London for another royal wedding.

"I camped out for Princess Margaret's wedding for 12 hours before," she said, referring to the 1960 wedding between the princess and Antony Armstrong-Jones.

"We had coffee on a Coleman stove and boiled the eggs in the coffee pot while we were making the coffee. It was great fun."

The couple said watching the event unfold on television was a treat. They bought their first TV to watch the Queen's coronation in 1953, the first to be televised.

"It was a Bush black and white TV, very blurry, but we all watched, thought it was amazing technology," said Charles Westropp.

Meanwhile, Bell Aliant said the royal wedding sent Atlantic Canadians scrambling to their computers on Friday morning. Across the region, internet usage on the company's network rose sharply around 5:30 a.m. AT, according to company spokeswoman Alyson Queen.

"Traffic patterns peaked to almost double the level of volume that we would normally see on a Friday morning when the ceremony started at 7 a.m.," Queen told CBC News.

"Those traffic volumes continued on the network until around 10 o'clock this morning Atlantic time."

Queen said Bell Aliant customers reported they were visiting websites that were streaming the event live, and were also using various forms of social media to comment on the ceremony.

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