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Russia is willing to extend New START nuclear treaty, Putin says

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that Moscow is prepared to immediately extend the only remaining nuclear arms reduction pact with the United States.

New START, set to expire in February, is the only remaining U.S.-Russia nuclear arms control treaty

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan in June. The two countries exchanged recriminations regarding their commitment to arms control, with the possibility a second major treaty will soon be voided. (Susan Walsh/The Associated Press)

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that Moscow is prepared to immediately extend the only remaining nuclear arms reduction pact with the United States.

Speaking at a meeting with military officials, Putin said that Russia has repeatedly offered the U.S. to extend the New START treaty that expires in February but that it hasn't heard back.

"Russia is ready to extend the New START treaty immediately, before the year's end and without any preconditions," he said.

The pact, which was signed in 2010 by U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, limits each country to no more than 1,550 deployed nuclear warheads and 700 deployed missiles and bombers.

The treaty, which can be extended by another five years, envisages a comprehensive verification mechanism to check compliance, including on-site inspections of each side's nuclear bases.

Its expiration would remove any limits on Russian and U.S. nuclear arsenals for the first time in decades.

Arms control advocates have argued that the failure to extend the pact would be highly destabilizing at a time when U.S.-Russia relations have sunk to the lowest levels since the Cold War.

INF pact scrapped this year

Putin and other Russian officials have repeatedly voiced concern about Washington's reluctance to discuss the treaty's extension.

"Our proposals have been on the table, but we have got no response from our partners," Putin said.

In an apparent bid to encourage the U.S. to extend the treaty, the Russian military last month showed its latest hypersonic weapon to U.S. inspectors. The Defence Ministry underlined that it demonstrated the Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle as part of transparency measures under the New START.

Putin unveiled the Avangard in 2018, along with other prospective weapons, noting that its ability to make sharp manoeuvres on its way to a target will render missile defence useless.

New START is the only remaining U.S.-Russia nuclear arms control treaty after both Moscow and Washington withdrew from the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty earlier this year.

The U.S. said it pulled out because of Russian violations, a claim the Kremlin has denied.

Putin reaffirmed Russia's pledge not to deploy missiles banned by the INF treaty until the U.S. and its allies do so.

"Russia isn't interested in unleashing a new arms race," he said.

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