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Police probe possible links between Manchester bomber, militants in U.K. and abroad

British police investigating the deadly Manchester Arena bombing earlier this week made a new arrest Friday while continuing to search addresses associated with the suicide attacker.

Ariana Grande says she will return to Manchester to hold benefit concert for bombing victims

Armed police officers are patrolling on board trains nationwide after the U.K. terror threat level rose to 'critical' in the wake of the Manchester attack. (Yui Mok/PA via AP)

British police investigating the deadly Manchester Arena bombing earlier this week made a new arrest Friday while continuing to search addresses associated with the suicide attacker.

Seven other men are in custody in connection with Monday's blast that killed 22 people. All seven, ranging in age from 18 to 38, are being held on suspicion of offences violating the Terrorism Act. 

A 16-year-old boy and a 34-year-old woman who had been arrested were released without charge, police said.

Authorities are chasing possible links between the suicide bomber, Salman Abedi, and militants in Manchester, elsewhere in Europe, and in North Africa and the Middle East. Britain's security level has been upgraded to "critical," meaning officials believe another attack may be imminent.

Salman Abedi, a college dropout who grew up in the Manchester area, was known to security services because of his radical views. He was the son of Libyan parents who migrated to Britain in the early 1990s. (Associated Press)

Abedi, a college dropout who grew up in the Manchester area, was known to security services because of his radical views. He was the son of Libyan parents who migrated to Britain in the early 1990s.

He reportedly was in contact with family members just before the attack.

The name of the man arrested in the early hours Friday and those of the seven others in custody were not released. No one has yet been charged in the bombing.

Labour leader links terrorism to foreign wars

Campaigning in Britain's general election, set for June 8, resumed after being suspended because of the bombing that followed an Ariana Grande concert Monday.

Opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, speaking in London, linked Britain's actions overseas to the increased extremist threat at home. He risks being accused of trying to capitalize on the Manchester bombing.

U.K. Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn delivers a speech during a campaign event in central London on Friday. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

He said many experts, including British intelligence professionals, see a connection between wars Britain has supported, such as the one in Libya, and terrorism in Britain.

British police working on the case have resumed intelligence-sharing with U.S. counterparts after a brief halt because of anger over leaks to U.S. media thought by Britain to be coming from U.S. officials.

British officials say that have receive assurances from U.S. authorities that confidential material will be protected

Reports of hate crimes rise since attack

Police Chief Ian Hopkins said Friday there has been an increase in reported hate crimes since the attack.

Hopkins said there is no place for discrimination and hatred in Manchester. He urged people to report any incidents.

He also said he has reached out to faith leaders to try to calm the situation.

London police on Friday said extra security is being added for major sporting events this weekend, including the FA Cup Final at Wembley Stadium.

The mountain of flowers placed in St Ann's Square in central Manchester for the victims of the attack is growing. (Emilio Morenatti/Associated Press)

Chief Supt. Jon Williams said that extra protection measures and officers are being deployed throughout the capital because of the increased terrorist threat level.

He said fans coming to football and rugby matches this weekend should come earlier than usual because of added security screening.

Williams said "covert and discreet tactics" will also be in place to protect the transport network.

He said police want the approach to be "unpredictable" and to make London "as hostile an environment as possible to terrorists."

Ariana Grande to return for benefit

U.S. pop star Ariana Grande said Friday that she will hold a benefit concert in Manchester for the victims of Monday's suicide bombing in the English city.

Grande, 23, said in a message on her Instagram account that a date for the concert had not yet been worked out.

Monday's suicide bombing, which killed 22 people, took place just after Grande had finished performing a concert in the northern English city. She later canceled several future concerts scheduled in London and Europe.

With files from Reuters

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