World

Iran to offer 'new package' in nuclear dispute: Ahmadinejad

Iran will soon present proposals aimed at resolving its standoff with the West over its nuclear enrichment program, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Wednesday.

Iran will soon present proposals aimed at resolving its standoff with the West over its nuclear enrichment program, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Wednesday.

In an address from southern Iran shown live on television, Ahmadinejad said he is willing to build a new relationship with the United States, but did not give details as to what Iran would propose to end the impasse.

"Today we are preparing a new package. Once it becomes ready, we will present that package [to you]," the president said. "It is a package that constitutes peace and justice throughout the globe and also respects other nations' rights."

Last week, representatives from the U.S., Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia said they would invite Iran for new talks over its nuclear program, which Tehran has continued despite the imposition of UN sanctions.

The U.S. and some of its allies accuse Tehran of seeking to build nuclear weapons. But Iran maintains its nuclear program is for the peaceful purpose of generating electricity.

Following Ahmadinejad's address, U.S. State Department spokesman Robert Wood said the United States would study any proposals put forward by Iran.

"Our hope will be that it addresses all of the concerns that the United States and other countries have about Iran's nuclear activities," Wood told reporters.

Last month, U.S. President Barack Obama used a video message to offer a "new beginning" with Iran, saying the United States wants to engage with Iranians and end a decades-long strained relationship.

But during his speech, Ahmadinejad boasted that Iran's resistance and progress in nuclear technology has forced Washington to retreat from its "bullying policies."

"You know well that today you are suffering from weaknesses. You have no choice," he said. "I advise you to change and correct your tone and respect other nations' rights."

now