Honduras lifts decree suspending rights

The interim government of Honduras has withdrawn a decree that had suspended some constitutionally guaranteed human rights in the politically divided country.

The interim government of Honduras on Monday withdrew a decree that had suspended some constitutionally guaranteed human rights in the politically divided country.

Interim President Roberto Micheletti said the decree "has been completely revoked."

Michelletti said earlier that the decree was no longer needed because "we have peace in the country."

"We want to go back to normalcy," Micheletti said.

The decree was issued on Sept. 27 after deposed President Manuel Zelaya made what Micheletti's government said were  "calls for an insurrection."

The decree barred unauthorized gatherings and gave police the right to make arrests without warrants.

The contentious decree led to dozens of arrests and the closure of a pair of media outlets that backed Zelaya.

Honduran soldiers ousted the left-leaning Zelaya in a June 28 coup amid a dispute over modifying the constitution. His opponents feared he wanted to modify the constitution to allow him to stay in office longer than the current one-term limit. Zelaya has denied that was his intention.

Zelaya slipped back into Honduras last week and is holed up in the Brazilian Embassy with about 40 family members and supporters.