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History made as Obama officially nominated for president

A historic moment happened late Wednesday afternoon in Denver as Barack Obama officially became the Democratic Party's candidate for U.S. president.

History was made late Wednesday afternoon in Denver as Barack Obama officially became the Democratic Party's candidate for U.S. president.

At the party's national convention, delegates, making grand statements about their party and nation, began voting state by state in a roll call for the Illinois senator to take up their mantle in the race for the White House.

But before Obama had even crossed the threshold of 2,210 delegates needed to claim the nomination, his chief rival in the primary race, Senator Hillary Clinton, moved that voting be suspended and Obama be declared the candidate by acclamation.

Delegates agreed, and Obama officially became the first black nominee of a major party in U.S. history.

While the outcome was certain, suspense lingered until the end over how the balloting would proceed, and for how long.

Many ardent Clinton supporters had said they wouldn't switch their votes to the presumptive winner despite the Democratic Party's aim of using the convention to smooth over lingering factionalism between the leading candidates' camps.

About an hour before the roll call, Clinton held an emotional gathering with her delegates to tell them she was releasing them to vote for Obama. Many at the Pepsi Center arena yelled back: "No!"

Clinton told her delegates she's not telling them what to do. "You've come here from so many different places, having made this journey and feeling in your heart what is right for you to do," she said.

In the end, Clinton received nearly 350 votes to Obama's 1,500 before the proceedings were stopped.

The convention was to hear speeches Wednesday night from former president Bill Clinton, as well as Obama's running mate, Delaware Senator Joe Biden. 

Obama is scheduled to give his acceptance speech Thursday night.

With files from the Associated Press

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