World

Hiroshima still tallying victims 60 years after bombing

The number of people in Hiroshima who have died from radiation-related disease continues to grow, as cities around the world prepare to mark the 60th anniversary of the devastating nuclear bombing.

The number of people in Hiroshima who have died from radiation-related disease continues to grow, as cities around the world prepare to mark the 60th anniversary of the devastating nuclear bombing.

Hiroshima officials now put the total dead at 237,062. This year, 5,000 more names are expected to be added to the list.

When the U.S. military's Enola Gay bomber dropped its nuclear payload on the city on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, 80,000 people were believed instantly vaporized.

By the end of 1945, the number of dead had reached about 140,000 out of the city's estimated population of 350,000. Three days later, a second bomb hit Nagasaki. Japan surrendered on Aug. 15, ending the Second World War.

About 85,000 Hiroshima survivors known as "hibakusa" are still living in the thriving city of nearly three million. Some say it's a miracle that the 400-year-old city was able to rebuild at all.

On Saturday, about 50,000 people will gather in Hiroshima's Peace Memorial Park. Wreaths will be laid and 1,000 doves set free. Temple bells will ring.

In Montreal, Hiroshima's twin city, a ceremony will take place at the botanical gardens, starting Friday evening.

In Vancouver, children will make paper cranes, the symbol of the anti-nuclear peace movement. They'll also construct paper lanterns to be set afloat in a pond at dusk to commemorate victims of wars, past and present.

CBC Newsworld will broadcast the documentary Hiroshima on The Passionate Eye, Sunday, Aug. 7, 2005 at 10 p.m.