World·Photos

France's Emmanuel Macron joins Trudeau in ranks of youngest world leaders

Emmanuel Macron, who is 39 years old, will join the ranks of the world's youngest leaders when he is inaugurated as president of France on Sunday.

Trudeau was elected prime minister in 2015 when he was 43 years old

Emmanuel Macron addresses supporters after winning the French presidential election at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Sunday. Macron, who is 39 years old, will join the ranks of the world's youngest leaders when he is inaugurated as president. (David Ramos/Getty Images)

Emmanuel Macron, who is 39 years old, will join the ranks of the world's youngest leaders when he is inaugurated as president of France on Sunday.

Other leaders past and present, elected and otherwise, were even younger when they came to power.

Here's a look at the leaders who were under 45 when they took office.

Moammar Gadhafi, Libya

The late Libyan leader was 27 when he seized power in 1969. The dictator held on to power until he was ousted in 2011. He was captured and killed a few months later.

Moammar Gadhafi is seen in Tripoli in September 1969. Gadhafi seized power in Libya when he was 27 and was the country's leader until he was ousted in 2011. (AFP files/Getty Images)

Fidel Castro, Cuba

The Cuban revolutionary leader, who died last year, was 32 when his rebel forces took control of Cuba. He ruled for nearly five decades as one of the world's last communist leaders.

Fidel Castro is seen during an address in Cuba after Fulgencio Batista was ousted in 1959. Castro was 32 when his rebel forces took control of Cuba. (Keystone/Getty Images)

Kim Jong-un, North Korea

The North Korean leader is quite possibly the world's youngest ruler. But, like so much about his country, his exact age remains something of a mystery. He is thought to be 32 or 33. Kim, the third generation in North Korea's ruling dynasty, assumed power in December 2011 upon the death of his father, Kim Jong-il.

Kim Jong-un is seen with the coffin of his father Kim Jong-il during his funeral procession in Pyongyang in December 2011. Kim, whose exact age remains unknown, is the third generation in North Korea's ruling dynasty. (Kyodo/Reuters)

Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua

Ortega was 33 when he became a leader of the junta that ran Nicaragua after the Sandinista revolution ousted dictator Anastasio Somoza in July 1979. In November 1984, just before his 39th birthday, Ortega was elected president. He was voted out in 1990 and then won re-election in 2006, 2011 and 2016.

Daniel Ortega is seen in this circa 1990 photo. In November 1984, just before his 39th birthday, Ortega was elected president of Nicaragua. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Gamal Abdel Nasser, Egypt

Nasser was 38 when he became president of Egypt in 1956. He nationalized the Suez Canal and championed the pan-Arab cause, becoming one of the world's most prominent anti-imperialist figures by the time of his death in 1970.

Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser gives a news conference at the government council chamber in Cairo in May 1967. Nasser was 38 when he became president of Egypt in 1956. (Terry Fincher/Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, Iceland

In Iceland, Gunnlaugsson became prime minister at 38 in 2013. He resigned in 2016 after details of his offshore financial holdings were revealed in the Panama Papers leak.

Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson hugs a supporter following general elections in Reykjavik, Iceland, in April 2013. He became prime minister at 38. (Brynjar Gauti/Associated Press)

Rajiv Gandhi, India

Gandhi was catapulted to India's highest office at age 40 when his mother, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, was assassinated in 1984. He began his premiership with promises of modernizing India's creaking government. Within a few years, he was forced to resign amid allegations of taking bribes in an arms deal. He was assassinated in 1991 while campaigning to return to office.

Rajiv Gandhi arrives at No. 10 Downing Street for talks with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in October 1985. Gandhi took over India's highest office at age 40 when his mother, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, was assassinated in 1984. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Turkey

Ataturk, the revered founder of the Republic of Turkey, was 42 when he became the country's first president in 1923. The revolutionary leader's last name means "Father of the Turks."

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, whose last name means "Father of the Turks," was 42 when he became Turkey's first president in 1923. (Keystone/Getty Images)

John F. Kennedy, U.S.

Kennedy was the youngest person ever elected to the presidency of the United States. The wealthy senator and war hero was 43 when he took the oath of office in 1961. But he was not the youngest U.S. president ever — that was Theodore Roosevelt, who was 42 when he took over after the assassination of President William McKinley.

U.S. President-elect John F. Kennedy and his wife are seen at an inauguration eve gala celebration in 1961. At 43, Kennedy was the youngest person to be elected U.S. president. (Associated Press)

Justin Trudeau, Canada

Trudeau was elected as Canada's prime minister in 2015, when he was 43. Like Rajiv Gandhi, he had a strong family connection to the office. His father, Pierre Trudeau, also served as prime minister.

Justin Trudeau is seen on stage at Liberal party headquarters in Montreal after winning the 42nd Canadian general election in October 2015. Trudeau was 43 years old at the time. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Tony Blair and David Cameron, U.K.

Blair was 43 when he was elected Britain's prime minister in 1997 — the country's youngest leader since 42-year-old Lord Liverpool in 1812. Cameron was also 43, but a few months younger than Blair, when he became Britain's leader in 2010. Things did not end well for either: Blair led the Labour Party to three straight victories, but was discredited for joining the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Cameron resigned last year after failing to convince Britons to remain in the European Union.

U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair, left, and Conservative leader David Cameron attend the Remembrance Sunday service in London in November 2006. Blair and Cameron were both 43 when they were first elected prime minister, in 1997 and 2010. (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

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