Edward Snowden would go back to U.S. if guaranteed fair trial: lawyer

NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden wants to return to the United States from Russia if he's guaranteed a fair trial, his Russian lawyer said Tuesday.
NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden would be willing to go back to the U.S. if he was guaranteed a free trial, his Russian lawyer says. The exact whereabouts of the NSA leaker are not known.

NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden wants to return to the United States from Russia if he's guaranteed a fair trial, his Russian lawyer said Tuesday.

Anatoly Kucherena told a news conference Tuesday that he has teamed up with U.S. and German lawyers to work on the issue, but gave no further details.


Edward Snowden live

CBC's Anna Maria Tremonti interviews U.S. National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden Wednesday. Watch the livestream from noon to 2 p.m. ET on CBCNews.ca.


Snowden was stranded in a Moscow airport in 2013 on his way from Hong Kong to Cuba, shortly after he released extensive documentation about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs. Russia has granted him asylum, attracting the ire of the United States.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has denied that the nation's security agencies had worked with Snowden.

Snowden's whereabouts have not been made public. Kucherena said Snowden moves freely but is accompanied by guards. "He goes shopping, he visits museums and theatres under escort," he said.

He said Snowden's longtime girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, visited him in Moscow. "They have a very good relationship," he said, adding that he rejects other potential dates offered for Snowden.

The lawyer, who presented his book about Snowden, praised him as a "heroic and open person," who has "principles and convictions" and didn't hesitate to defy the U.S. government.

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