World

U.K. foreign secretary under fire after saying taking a knee as protest comes from Game of Thrones

Britain's foreign secretary has drawn criticism after he suggested in an interview that taking a knee appeared to be from Game of Thrones and was a symbol of subjugation.

'It feels to me like a symbol of subjugation and subordination,' says Dominic Raab

Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab arrives in Downing Street in London on Thursday. (John Sibley/Reuters)

Britain's foreign secretary has drawn criticism after he suggested in an interview that taking a knee appeared to be from Game of Thrones and was a symbol of subjugation.

Dominic Raab told TalkRadio Thursday that he understood the frustration driving the Black Lives Matter movement, before adding: "I've got to say on this taking the knee thing — which I don't know, maybe it's got a broader history — but it seems to be taken from the Game of Thrones."

"It feels to me like a symbol of subjugation and subordination, rather than one of liberation and emancipation," he said. "But I understand people feel differently about it, so it is a matter of personal choice."

David Lammy, the justice spokesperson for Britain's opposition Labour Party, said the remarks were insulting and "deeply embarrassing."

Raab later took to Twitter to stress he has full respect for the Black Lives Matter movement and anyone who chooses to take a knee. Downing Street said that Raab had been expressing a "personal opinion."

The gesture has come to be recognized as a symbolic act in opposing racism and police violence and has been widely used by people worldwide protesting the death of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis on May 25.

It gained momentum in 2016 when American football player Colin Kaepernick took the knee during the national anthem before a game to protest racism and police brutality.

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