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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Sunday

Inside the Olympic "bubble" where athletes and others involved in the Games have spent the past two weeks, a total of 430 COVID-19 cases had been reported as of Sunday.

Tokyo 2020 concludes with 430 Games-related COVID-19 cases in Olympic 'bubble'

A person wearing a protective face mask walks past a Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games sign in Tokyo on Sunday. While organizers touted the low infection rate among what they call the world's 'most tested community,' the Games coincided with a surge in cases in the host city. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

The latest:

Inside the Olympic "bubble" where athletes and others involved in the Games have spent the past two weeks, a total of 430 COVID-19 cases had been reported as of Sunday.

No Canadian athlete had tested positive for the virus as of Sunday, said Canadian Olympic Committee president Tricia Smith during the COC's virtual closing news conference.

While organizers have touted the low infection rate among what they call the world's "most tested community," the Games coincided with a surge in cases in the host city.

Tokyo has reported record daily case numbers in the past week and the number of infections in Japan has increased by more than 140,000 since the Olympics began on July 23.

Medical workers tend to a COVID-19 patient in Yokohama, Japan, on Sunday. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga and Tokyo 2020 organizers have reiterated that the event had not contributed to rising infections.

But senior medical adviser Shigeru Omi told parliament that hosting the Games may have affected public sentiment and eroded the impact of government requests for people to stay home.

Outside of the Olympic bubble, Japan has defended a new policy of asking patients with milder symptoms to isolate at home rather than going to hospital.

The number of serious cases have continued to increase in Tokyo, with the number of seriously ill patients rising to 150 as of Saturday.

Suga has said only patients who were seriously ill and those at risk of becoming so would be hospitalized, while others should isolate at home, a shift in policy some fear may lead to an increase in deaths.


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What's happening in Canada

People walk by a COVID-19 vaccination sign in Montreal on Sunday. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

What's happening around the world

As of Sunday, more than 202.4 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported around the world, according to the coronavirus tracker maintained by U.S.-based Johns Hopkins University. The reported global death toll stood at more than 4.3 million.

In Africa, Tunisian authorities aim to vaccinate more than one million people aged 40 and over in only one day, compared with 30,000 to 60,000 a day previously. Authorities provided free buses for people going to vaccination centres, many set up in schools.

PHOTOS | Tunisia's massive COVID-19 vaccination drive:

In Europe, Britain's competition watchdog said Sunday it will look into the cost of COVID-19 testing for travellers after U.K. Health Secretary Sajid Javid complained that high prices for the government-mandated tests were preventing some people from going on vacation. Rapid tests required for most travellers average about 75 pounds ($130 Cdn) each.

In Asia, Iran has reported more new infections and deaths across the country than on any other single day since the pandemic began. Health authorities logged over 39,600 new cases and 542 deaths from the virus. The new all-time highs push Iran's total number of infections over 4.1 million and pandemic deaths to over 94,000, the most in the Middle East.

In the AmericasDr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government's top infectious disease expert, predicts regulators will give full approval to coronavirus vaccines by the month's end, which he hopes will spur a wave of vaccine mandates in the private sector as well as schools and universities. U.S. President Joe Biden's administration is currently weighing what levers it can push to encourage more unvaccinated Americans to get their shots as the delta variant continues to surge.


Have a coronavirus question or news tip for CBC News? Email: Covid@cbc.ca or join us live in the comments now.

With files from The Associated Press, The Canadian Press and CBC News

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