World

CIA director says ending Iran nuclear deal 'the height of folly'

Outgoing CIA Director John Brennan has said it would be the "height of folly" for U.S. president-elect Donald Trump to tear up Washington's deal with Tehran because it would make it more likely that Iran and others would acquire nuclear weapons.

John Brennan believes it would encourage other nations to ramp up nuclear programmes

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Director John Brennan participates in a session at the third annual Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, DC, U.S. on September 8, 2016. (Gary Cameron/Reuters)

Outgoing CIA Director John Brennan has said it would be the "height of folly" for U.S. president-elect Donald Trump to tear up Washington's deal with Tehran because it would make it more likely that Iran and others would acquire nuclear weapons.

"It could lead to a weapons programme inside of Iran that could lead other states in the region to embark on their own programmes,"

Brennan said in an interview with the BBC aired on Wednesday. "So I think it would be the height of folly if the next administration were to tear up that agreement."

Brennan also said that in dealing with the Syrian crisis, Trump should be cautious in trying to work with Russia.

Donald Trump consistently criticized the Iran nuclear deal struck by the Obama administration on the campaign trail. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

"I hope there is going to be an improvement in relations between Washington and Moscow," he said.

"President-elect Trump and the new administration need to be wary of Russian promises. Russian promises in my mind have not given us what it is that they have pledged."

During the campaign trial Trump deemed the pact "a horrible deal," while his running mate Mike Pence said if elected, their administration should "rip up" the deal.

With files from CBC News

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