World

Bush undergoes colonoscopy

Doctors removed five small polyps as they performed a colonoscopy Saturday on U.S. President George W. Bush.

Doctors removed five small polyps as they performed a colonoscopy Saturday on U.S. President George W. Bush.

None of the polyps found inside his large intestine "appeared worrisome,"White House spokesman Scott Stanzel said.

Bush, 61, underwent the procedure, routinely used to check for colon cancer, at Camp David in Maryland.

While he was under the effects of anesthesia, Vice-President Dick Cheney held the powers of the presidency for roughly two and a half hours.

Bush relinquished his authority by implementing Section 3 of the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment — approved in 1967, four years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated — has been used only twice before.

The first time was in July 1985 when President Ronald Reagan underwent surgery and turned over power to his vice-president, Bush's father.

The other time was in June 2002 when Bush relinquished his presidential powers to Cheney for more than two hours during a colon cancer scan.

Bush's colonoscopy in 2002 revealed no medical problems, but he had benign polyps removed from his colon while he was governor of Texas — two in July 1998 and two in December 1999.

With files from the Associated Press

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