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Joe Biden denies sexual assault allegation of ex-Senate employee in 1990s

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Friday emphatically denied allegations from a former Senate staffer that he sexually assaulted her in the early 1990s, declaring flatly "this never happened."

Biden calls on National Archives to identify any record of a complaint made by former employee Tara Reade

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden admitted last year to some inappropriate behaviour in his past in dealings with women, but said Friday the sexual assault allegation by former Senate staffer Tara Reade is not true. (Matt Rourke/The Associated Press)

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Friday denied allegations from a former Senate staffer that he sexually assaulted her in the early 1990s, declaring flatly "this never happened."

Biden's first public remarks on the accusation from a former employee, Tara Reade, come at a critical moment for the presumptive Democratic nominee as he tries to relieve mounting pressure after weeks of leaving denials to his campaign.

"I'm saying unequivocally, it never, never happened," the former vice-president and senator said in an interview on MSNBC's Morning Joe.

Biden said he will ask the National Archives to determine whether there is any record of a complaint being filed, as Reade has claimed. He said it was the only possible place a complaint would be, and that his Senate papers held under seal at the University of Delaware do not contain personnel records.

"The former staffer has said she filed a complaint back in 1993," Biden said. "But she does not have a record of this alleged complaint."

Reade did not immediately respond to a request for comment Friday. The National Archives deflected inquiries to Capitol Hill: "Any records of Senate personnel complaints from 1993 would have remained under the control of the Senate."

Senate officials did not immediately respond to a request for information.

Biden, in his TV interview, said "there are so many inconsistencies" in Reade's various accounts. But he also said he does not "question her motive." He said that over his five decades in public life, none of his employees was asked to sign a nondisclosure agreement.

Watch | Biden responds to the allegation on Morning Joe:

'The claims are false': Joe Biden denies sexually assaulting former staffer

2 years ago
Duration 0:15
Appearing on MSNBC, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden clearly denied the allegation that he sexually assaulted a former Senate staffer in the 1990s.

Reade publicly accused Biden of inappropriate touching last year, but did not allege sexual assault. In recent weeks, she's given a handful of interviews, saying Biden's actions went further than she initially disclosed.

Accuser has given multiple interviews

In an interview with The Associated Press, she detailed a 1993 encounter that she says occurred when she was asked by a supervisor to bring Biden his gym bag as he was on his way down to the Senate gymnasium. Reade says Biden pushed her against a wall in the basement of a Capitol Hill office building, groped her and penetrated her with his fingers.

Republicans are seizing on Reade's allegation to cast Democrats as only defending women who allege wrongdoing against conservatives. They're digging in despite the possibility of renewed attention on the multiple sexual assault allegations lodged against President Donald Trump.

Trump has stepped delicately around the Biden controversy.

"He's going to have to make his own decision," Trump said in a podcast interview Friday with Dan Bongino. "I'm not going to be telling him what to do."

The president said it would be a "great thing" if Biden had records that could "dispose" of Reade's allegation.

Former Democratic National Committee chair Donna Brazile said before Biden's interview that his silence was "damaging," but afterward said he handled the matter well.

"He responded, he denied it, and there's nothing more to be added to it," Brazile said, before alluding to Reade's repeated public statements. "If you add to the story the way Tara Reade has, it only brings more confusion."

Karen Finney, who worked for Hillary Clinton in 2016, described Biden as "very clear and consistent" and "sincere," but said, "I wish they had done this a little bit sooner."

The November contest between Biden and Trump will be the first presidential race of the #MeToo era, during which numerous women have come forward with allegations of sexual harassment and assault. Trump has been accused of assault and unwanted touching by numerous women, allegations he denies.

Biden, then a senator, is shown speaking with Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on April 9, 1993. Reade, a former staff member for Biden, alleges he assaulted her in the spring of that year in a Capitol Hill office building. (Chris Helgren/Reuters)

Women are a core constituency for Democrats, and Biden has a mixed history. He wrote the Violence Against Women Act as a senator, but came under heavy criticism for his handling of Anita Hill's Senate testimony in the 1990s. Just before he launched his 2020 campaign, several women accused him of unwanted touching, behaviour for which he apologized.

Biden has pledged to pick a woman as a running mate, and the allegation has left those thought to be in contention in a tough spot.

"Women deserve to be heard," said Stacey Abrams, the former Georgia Democratic governor candidate, "but I also believe that those allegations have to be investigated by credible sources."

Some Democratic donors say the matter hasn't come up in recent strategy calls. Others worry it could be used against Biden, much as Republicans harped in 2016 on Clinton's private email server and the activities of the Clinton Foundation.

"We know they're going to try elements of the same playbook," said Finney, talking specifically about calls for Biden to release his Senate papers.

Other Democratic operatives expressed concern the allegation complicates a central Biden campaign rationale: that he provides a moral counter to Trump.

"I think we have to apply a consistent standard for how we treat allegations of sexual assault, and also be clear-eyed about how Donald Trump will use these allegations in the general election campaign," said Claire Sandberg, who worked as Bernie Sanders's organizing director.

Republicans accuse Democrats of hypocrisy

Trump joined fellow Republicans in arguing that Democrats aren't being consistent, pointing again Friday to the aggressive questioning of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh when he faced an allegation of sexual assault.

Biden said Friday that women "should start off with the presumption they are telling the truth. Then you have to look at the circumstances and the facts. And the facts of this case do not exist."

Trump's reelection campaign quickly released a digital ad featuring prominent Democrats, including Biden and Clinton saying, "Believe women" and similar sentiments.

Biden is seen with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi last year at the funeral of former congressman Elijah Cummings in Baltimore. Pelosi and other prominent Democratic women on Thursday said they believed Biden. (Steve Ruark/The Associated Press)

"Ladies and gentleman, we just can't have it both ways," Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway said at the White House. "We cannot decide which women were included in 'believe all women.'"

Asked whether the controversy will refocus attention on Trump's history, Conway said, "If you do that, then you're going to hear a lot from Tara Reade and other people."

With files from CBC News

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