World

6.7M quake hits near Indonesia's Java island

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.7 struck in the Indian Ocean south of Indonesia's island of Java early Monday morning, prompting authorities to briefly issue a tsunami warning that sent thousands fleeing their homes in panic.

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.7 struck in the Indian Ocean south of Indonesia's island of Java early Monday morning, prompting authorities to briefly issue a tsunami warning that sent thousands fleeing their homes in panic.

There were no immediate reports of injuries or damages.

The quake occurred about 412 kilometres south-southeast of Jakarta at 3:06 a.m. local time at a depth of 24 kilometres, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The temblor prompted Indonesian seismologists to issue a tsunami warning.

Thousands of people in the town of Cilacap poured into the streets and ran to higher ground, many gathering in mosques, witnesses told El Shinta radio. Ninety minutes later, when the threat of a tsunami had passed, they were told to go home.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii said that a destructive widespread tsunami threat doesn't exist based on historical earthquake and tsunami data.

Indonesia, the world's largest archipelago, is prone to seismic upheaval because of its location on the so-called Ring of Fire, an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin. 

A 9.1-magnitude quake with a subsequent tsunami on Dec. 26, 2004, killed more than 230,000 people in a dozen nations, nearly three-quarters of them in western Indonesia.

With files from The Associated Press

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