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Obamas, Royals talk trash on Twitter ahead of Invictus Games

With the Invictus Games just days away, the Royal Family and the U.S. president and his wife are goading each other on Twitter, hoping to inspire their compatriots to victory. And the first round goes to the Brits.

Prince Harry enlists Queen for prefect response to U.S. video

With the Invictus Games just days away, the Royal Family and the U.S. president and his wife are goading each other on Twitter, hoping to inspire their compatriots to victory. 

The Twitter account of Michelle Obama posted a video addressed to @KensingtonRoyal on Friday morning. 

"Hey, Prince Harry," says  President Barack Obama's wife. "Remember when you told us to 'bring it' at the Invictus Games?

"Careful what you wish for," the president warns. 

At the end of the video, three Invictus Games competitors approach the camera, doing their best to intimidate their British rival.

Two of them pull frightening faces. One of them, though, remains straight-faced and, well, he "drops the bomb." 

"Boom," he says, gesturing to the camera. 

The video appeared to go over well with followers of @FLOTUS. 

And reply they did. Prince Harry tweeted back from the royals' account minutes later. 

But it didn't end there. 

Harry enlisted his grandmother, the Queen, to prepare a more proper response. 

The Queen and Harry are seen watching the Americans' video, but they don't seem too impressed. 

"Oh, really," the Queen remarks. "Please." 

And, in the video's coup de grâce, Harry mocks the bomb-dropping gesture. 

"Boom," he says derisively, mugging to the camera. 

The Invictus Games are an international athletic event started by Prince Harry for wounded, injured and sick service personnel. They will be held in Orlando, Fla., from May 8 to 12.  

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