No feature goes unchanged in revealing digital retouching video

We all know that the images of beautiful people we see adorning glossy pages of high-fashion magazines and their online counterparts are digitally retouched – but new time-lapse videos made by an expert who works on fashion magazine images reveal just how far "retouching" goes.

What is really done to images of models between the click of the camera and the news stand?

"With all the talk about photoshop use or overuse, I thought it would be interesting for people to see how we actually add pores to skin," digital retouching expert Elizabeth Moss told PetaPixel. (Rare Digital Art)

We all know that the images of beautiful people we see adorning glossy pages of high-fashion magazines and their online counterparts are digitally retouched – but new time-lapse videos made by an expert who works on fashion magazine images reveal just how far "retouching" goes. 

Photographer Elizabeth Moss is head retoucher for New York City-based Rare Digital Art, a retouching company that has done work for high-fashion heavy-hitters like Vogue, Elle, GQ and Vanity Fair

Moss made the behind-the-scenes videos of her work to show people what actually goes into the retouching done on models in magazine photos. In one, six hours of retouching work is condensed into 90 seconds:

The time-lapse process shows that nearly every feature is altered – hair, skin, pores, lips, nose, ears, fingernails, eyes, eyelashes, eyebrows – nothing goes untouched. 

"These videos are unique because none of the high-end retouchers make these type of videos, so the quality of the other before and after retouching videos available online are pretty terrible and not at all representative of what is typically done on high-fashion editorials and campaigns," Moss told photography blog PetaPixel.

This one shows four hours of work done by Moss and her team shortened into 90 seconds:

This video condenses 90 minutes of retouching into a 90-second clip: 

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