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#DeadRaccoonTO honoured at CNE butter sculpture showcase

#DeadRaccoonTO was resurrected at this year's butter sculpture showcase at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto.

Dead raccoon attracted street vigil while lying on Toronto sidewalk in July

An artist created a #DeadRaccoonTO butter sculpture, as pictured in this photo posted by CBC's Stu Mills to Twitter, at Toronto's CNE. (StuMillsCBC/Twitter)

#DeadRaccoonTO was resurrected at this year's butter sculpture showcase at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto.

The dead raccoon, which Torontonians posthumously named Conrad, attracted a sidewalk vigil complete with flowers, a framed photograph and a donation box when its lifeless body lay on a sidewalk for more than 14 hours one July day.

Now, the raccoon is being honoured in a different way. A butter sculptor drew inspiration from the raccoon's tale for her exhibit in this year's butter sculpture showcase at the CNE.

Perhaps fittingly, the theme of this year's artwork is celebrities, according to the CNE website.

The sculpture appears to be the work of self-described sculptor and budding farmer Olenka Kleban, who posted photos of the piece to her Instagram account.

The artist appears to have paid close attention to detail when re-creating Conrad in butter.

The sculptor included some scattered flowers and even the framed photograph of the raccoon.

But one of the raccoon's fans noticed that butter Conrad was not holding a cigarette, which someone had placed in the dead raccoon's paw as part of the vigil.

This picture taken of the sidewalk vigil shows Conrad holding the cigarette, which is missing from his butter statue.

(@jasonwagar/Twitter)

Despite the small discrepancy, the butter sculpture seemed to help many recall fond memories of the late raccoon.

Other butter sculptures currently include one of the Minions created by Agnes Niewiadomski.

The exhibition opened Aug. 21 and its final day is Monday, Sept. 7.

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