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Cosmo accused of racial bias in trends that 'need to die' list

Fashion magazines are always publishing their Do's and Don'ts columns, but Cosmo's latest — in which black models are used to illustrate trends that "need to die" but not showcased for any that are deemed trendy — is being given a major DON'T online.

White women dominate Cosmopolitan's trends 'Do' list



Fashion magazines are always publishing their Do's and Don'ts columns, but Cosmo's latest — in which black models are used to illustrate trends that "need to die" but not showcased for any that are deemed trendy — is being given a major DON'T online.

The feature, appearing on Cosmopolitan.com, focused on fashion faux pas and was accused of being racist. It included 21 beauty trends that are dying and Cosmo-approved alternatives, but overwhelmingly the women of colour that are featured appear exclusively in the Don't column. While the examples of Do's are almost exclusively all white women.

The reaction was harsh and unforgiving.

The magazine issued an apology via Twitter, saying it means to empower all women and will try to do better in the future.

"This article focuses on beauty trends with images that represent those trends," editors said in a statement. "Some images have been taken out of context, and we apologize for any offence."

However, the post wasn't taken down and the magazine was taken to task for what was perceived as a superficial and flimsy apology, with many calling for a boycott of Cosmo and starting a #BoycottCosmo hashtag.

Last year, Vogue Paris, Harper's and Vogue U.K. did not feature a single person of colour on their cover. 

With files from Natasha Fatah