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Carolina Hurricanes ask Dallas Stars to 'hockey and chill'

NHL team in North Carolina might not have known what it was implying with its "hockey and chill" tweet, but after the internet chimed in, we're sure they do now.

Hockey team likely did not actually want to do the equivalent of 'Netflix and chill' on ice

A Carolina Hurricane player, left, is sprawled out beside a Dallas Star player, in a photo tweeted by the Hurricanes asking the Stars if they wanted to 'hockey and chill.' (Carolina Hurricanes/Twitter)

The NHL's Carolina Hurricanes might not have known what they were implying with their "hockey and chill" tweet on Tuesday night, but after the internet chimed in, we're sure they do now.

The North Carolina hockey franchise was up against the Dallas Stars, currently one of the best teams in the NHL, and right as the game was about to start, the Hurricanes made an interesting proposition: "@DallasStars time for hockey and chill?"

The accompanying image, which shows a Carolina player, in red, and a Dallas player sprawled out on the ice, prompted a lot of head scratching. The Dallas Stars appeared especially confused and replied with a quote from the film The Princess Bride

"Netflix and chill" is modern web colloquial English for arranging a meeting with another person with the pretext of sitting in the same room and binge watching TV shows and movies. 

The subtext, however, is that the parties involved are romantically inclined, and suggests that the movie-watching will include more intimate relations.

The Hurricanes responded to the Dallas Stars with another quote from the Princess Bride. 

The exchange did however leave a contingent of fans who were excited about the possibility of a two-team Netflix and chill. 

The Dallas Stars did not chill in any way during the game, and beat the Hurricanes 5-4.

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