TOPIC: CLIMATE CHANGE

Earth's oceans were the hottest, most acidic on record in 2021, UN report finds

The world's oceans grew to their warmest and most acidic levels on record last year, the World Meteorological Organization said on Wednesday, as United Nations officials warned that war in Ukraine threatened global climate commitments.
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Six months since the B.C. floods; International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia 2022

Six months ago today, floods ravaged parts of the Fraser Valley. Today, we're looking back on those events, and the short- and long-term impacts of climate change on B.C. producers. In our second half, it's the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia 2022. We're talking to Elizabeth Saewyc, Executive Director of the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre, and Alex Sangha, founder of Sher Vancouver, a support service for LGBTQ+ South Asians and their friends, families, and allies.
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How long will Canada’s glaciers last?

Climate change is having a huge impact on Canada’s Rocky Mountain glaciers, and scientists say we have already passed the tipping point. Meteorologist Christy Climenhaga travelled to the Athabasca Glacier, the focal point of the Icefields Parkway, to learn more about the rapid glacial recession and what it will mean for Canada’s future.
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How accessible are EV charging stations across Canada?

How many electric vehicle charging stations are in Canada? How many would it take to support a country full of EVs? How long do they take to charge? Here's what you wanted to know.
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Ontario's Green party releases its plans for northern Ontario

This has been quite the week for the provincial election campaign in northern Ontario with the northern leaders debate, and northern platforms being rolled out. The Green Party just released its plan for the north. We spoke about the new northern platform with Green party leader Mike Schreiner.
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Thousands of Canadians still waiting in queue for surgeries; how desalination could solve the growing water crisis; architecture critic Alex Bozikovic on Canada’s lost buildings and the memories within them

As soon as the pandemic hit, the world of medicine shifted its focus. That meant surgeries that weren’t deemed life-threatening were put on hold. Today, thousands of Canadians are still waiting for their turn to come. Matt Galloway speaks with Amber Nurse and Linda Kroeker, who are both waiting for knee surgery; and Dr. David Urbach, the head of the department of surgery at Women's College Hospital. Then, the southwestern United States is in the grips of a historic drought — and now, one of the country’s biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead, has seen its water levels plummet. It’s the result of a two-decades-long dry spell fuelled by climate change. John Fleck, a professor of water policy and governance at the University of New Mexico, talks about the importance of Lake Mead; and Peter Fiske, director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation and the Water-Energy Resilience Institute, explains why desalination could solve the growing water crisis. And in his new book, 305 Lost Buildings of Canada, architecture critic Alex Bozikovic explores some of Canada’s greatest lost buildings — and the memories and stories that lived within them.
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How desalination could solve the growing water crisis

The southwestern United States is in the grips of a historic drought — and now, one of the country’s biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead, has seen its water levels plummet. It’s the result of a two-decades-long dry spell fuelled by climate change. John Fleck, a professor of water policy and governance at the University of New Mexico, talks about the importance of Lake Mead; and Peter Fiske, director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation and the Water-Energy Resilience Institute, explains why desalination could solve the growing water crisis.
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Quebec weighs call to pause all urban sprawl and highway expansions

A provincial climate-change committee that advises the Quebec government is making some bold recommendations, while the province's transport minister says he's focused on public transit.

World could see 1.5 C of warming in next 5 years, WMO reports

The world faces a 50 per cent chance of warming 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, if only briefly, by 2026, the World Meteorological Organization says.

Extreme weather events have strained farmers' mental health. But asking for help still a hurdle for many

Farmers in B.C. say the past year of extreme weather events has affected their mental health and are warning that many in the agricultural sector are reluctant to seek help when they need it. Some researchers are developing supports with the agricultural life in mind.
Analysis

What happens in India doesn't stay in India. Why this deadly heat wave has a wide reach

The persistent heat wave that has struck India over the past few weeks is leading to deaths, electricity shortages and uncertainty about crops and those impacts will likely not remain within its borders.

Europe's path away from Russian oil and toward renewable energy is paved with a dirty reality

As Europe vows to kick its reliance on Russian fossil fuels in response to Moscow's weaponization of its energy supply, climate advocates hope it could spur a more rapid transition to renewable energy. But experts say it won't happen overnight.
Q&A

Parts of India and Pakistan could become too hot for people to survive, warns scientist

If the world doesn't drastically reduce its carbon emissions, India and Pakistan will become too hot for people to live there, says climate scientist Chandni Singh.

Conserving water in Metro Vancouver still vital — even with cooler, wetter summer ahead, experts say

Although this summer is forecast to be cooler and wetter compared to 2021, experts say it's vital to conserve the water supply of Metro Vancouver, which is facing the increasing pressures of a growing population and a dwindling snowpack feeding reservoirs.

Heat wave in India sparks blackouts and highlights dependence on coal

An unusually early and brutal heat wave is scorching parts of India, where acute power shortages are affecting millions as demand for electricity surges to record levels

Pothole season in Winnipeg this year could be taste of what's to come with climate change

With more periods of intense rain and snow, more extreme temperatures and longer freeze-thaw cycles, climate change is expected to wreak havoc on Winnipeg's city roads.
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India issues heat wave warning as temperatures hit 45 C

An early summer heat wave has swept across India bringing temperatures over 40 C for more than a billion people. The country endured the hottest March on record this year.

Ottawa can't expect local government to handle cost of climate disaster alone, says B.C. mayor

The mayor of Abbotsford, B.C., says expecting local governments to shoulder the cost of infrastructure upgrades to protect their communities from flooding has been a 'monumental mistake.'
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Can small modular nuclear reactors help in the climate change fight?

As part of action on climate change, the recent budget pledged $120 million to develop a new type of nuclear technology: small modular reactors. Matt Galloway talks about cost and safety concerns, and what the technology will bring to the climate change fight, with John Gorman, president of the Canadian Nuclear Association; and Susan O'Donnell, adjunct research professor for the environment and society program at St. Thomas University.
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Can small modular nuclear reactors help in the climate change fight?; Dr. Brian Goldman on The Power of Teamwork; and new film Batata follows decade-long plight of stranded Syrian migrant workers

As part of action on climate change, the recent budget pledged $120 million to develop a new type of nuclear technology: small modular reactors. Matt Galloway talks about cost and safety concerns, and what the technology will bring to the climate change fight, with John Gorman, president of the Canadian Nuclear Association; and Susan O'Donnell, adjunct research professor for the environment and society program at St. Thomas University. Then, Dr. Brian Goldman discusses his new book The Power of Teamwork, why the medical world in particular has been slow to catch on to teamwork’s benefits, and how improv comedy and the pandemic are changing that. And Canadian filmmaker Noura Kevorkian was making a documentary about Syrian migrant workers in Lebanon — but the eruption of the civil war led her on a 10-year odyssey. She tells us about moving into a refugee camp to tell the stories in her film, Batata.
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How will a property tax increase pay for HRM's climate plan?

Property owners in HRM will see a tax hike to pay for the municipality's climate plan. But how will that money be spent? We ask HRM's director of environment and climate change Shannon Miedema. Plus, find out about her participation in Emera's Smart Energy Event this week.
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Weekend Briefing

With an extinction threat looming, no wonder polar bears are at our door — and on the roof

There's a grim reason why polar bears have been showing up in droves in coastal communities far away from their Arctic feeding grounds, writes John Gushue. Climate change is not only shrinking their territory but is putting the species under intense pressure for survival.

Carbon capture company founded by UBC geologists wins $1M international funding prize

A small company incorporated by geologists at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver got a big boost on Earth Day for their discoveries which speed the ability for rocks to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
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Why addressing energy poverty is a climate solution

This week: the first hour-long episode of What On Earth. • Producer Kristin Nelson sets out to find out how Canada can bring low-income households along in the transition to net zero. • We meet an academic who walked away from tenure to work on the front lines of climate change. • Associate producer Rachel Sanders shares what B.C. farmers are saying about the effect of extreme weather on their mental health -- and we hear about emerging solutions.
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How climate change is affecting farmers' mental health

Associate producer Rachel Sanders shares what B.C. farmers are saying about the effect of extreme weather on their mental health — and we hear about emerging solutions.

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