TOPIC: CLIMATE CHANGE

Audio

What you need to know about monkeypox; what the Texas school shooting might mean for U.S. gun control; B.C. communities preparing for potential summer floods and wildfires; and how this year’s baseballs are affecting play in the MLB

Health officials in Canada are investigating around two dozen cases of monkeypox, a relative of the smallpox virus not normally seen outside of Africa. Matt Galloway speaks with infectious diseases specialists Dr. Isaac Bogoch, and Dr. Dimie Ogoina, who was on the frontline of a 2017 monkeypox outbreak in Nigeria. Then, gun control activists are hoping for change following Tuesday’s school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. We talk to Michele Gay, the executive director and co-founder of Safe and Sound Schools, whose daughter was killed in the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. We also hear from Arelis Hernandez, the Texas correspondent for the Washington Post; and gun control advocate Matt Bennett. Also, after successive wildfires, floods and storms last summer, the CBC’s Sarah Penton visited communities in British Columbia to find out how they’re preparing for potential climate-related disasters in the months ahead. And are softer baseballs affecting play in the MLB this year? Robert Arthur, a data scientist and freelance journalist, explains why pitchers and hitters are grumbling about the new type of balls they're playing with.
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How three B.C. communities are preparing for potential floods and wildfires this summer

After successive wildfires, floods and storms last summer, the CBC’s Sarah Penton visited communities in British Columbia to find out how they’re preparing for potential climate-related disasters in the months ahead.

What's a derecho and why is it so destructive? The science behind this powerful storm

When Canadian tornado expert David Sills studied the forecast on Saturday morning, he never expected the line of storms headed for Windsor, Ont., would soon strengthen into Canada’s first derecho in decades, wreaking havoc across southern Ontario and Quebec.  

Ecological impact of Mount Polley mine disaster confirmed by new study

Newly published research shows a higher concentration of copper and other heavy metals in freshwater scuds and mayfly larvae taken from Polley and Quesnel lakes.
Audio

Allergy season is getting longer and experts say climate change is to blame; Vinyl Cafe: Odd Jobs; and author Mary Roach examines the world of animal crime

Studies have found allergy season is getting longer and more intense, and experts are blaming climate change. To learn more about the amped up allergy season, Matt Galloway speaks with Cecilia Sierra Heredia, lecturer at the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University, and Anne Ellis, a professor of medicine and chair of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Queen's University. Then, we bring you a classic story from the Vinyl Cafe: Stuart McLean's Odd Jobs. And in her new book Fuzz: When Nature Breaks The Law, Mary Roach explores the world of animal crime. She says although we're trying all sorts of things to deal with human-wildlife conflict, we're mostly failing because it's human behaviour that needs to change.
Audio

Allergy season is getting longer and experts say climate change is to blam

Studies have found allergy season is getting longer and more intense, and experts are blaming climate change. To learn more about the amped up allergy season, Matt Galloway speaks with Cecilia Sierra Heredia, lecturer at the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University, and Anne Ellis, a professor of medicine and chair of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Queen's University.
Audio

How to be a climate optimist

After 20 years covering climate change around the world, reporting on the newest strategies to lower emissions and following the scientists and policymakers working to make a better world, Calgary-based writer Chris Turner says he's finally turned the corner. He's gone from being a climate pessimist, to a climate optimist. In his new book, How to Be a Climate Optimist: Blueprints for a Better World, Turner delves into the global climate solutions that are making a difference, revealing why they give him hope for the future. He speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about the book and what more needs to be done to reach "net-zero" — and explains why he believes optimism is essential if we're going to tackle one of the most critical issues of our time.
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The Sunday Magazine for May 22, 2022

This week on The Sunday Magazine with Piya Chattopadhyay: • Washington Post reporters Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa talk about the life and legacy of George Floyd • Rock icon Joan Jett goes acoustic with her new album, Changeup • Calgary writer Chris Turner makes his case for climate optimism • Tsering Yangzom Lama explores art, history and belonging through the lens of the Tibetan diaspora with her debut novel Plus: We dig into The Sunday Magazine archive, to highlight what American soccer superstar and Olympic gold medalist Megan Rapinoe told Chattopadhyay about her fight for pay equity, now that the U.S. Soccer Federation has signed-on. Discover more at http://www.cbc.ca/1.6460611

Australian PM concedes election defeat as Labor Party looks likely to form government

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has conceded defeat in a national election, saying that while vote counting is incomplete, the opposition Labor Party looks likely to form a government.
Stories About Here

Our cities will keep flooding. What if we stopped fighting it and worked with nature instead?

Learning to live with fluctuating rivers could be better for ourselves and our environment, writes Uytae Lee, who explores solutions to flooding in the final episode of 'Stories About Here' on CBC Gem.

Australian election underway, with poll-leading Labor Party hoping for 1st win since 2007

Vote counting started in Australia's election on Saturday that will decide whether Prime Minister Scott Morrison's conservative government can defy odds and rule for a fourth three-year term.
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Ontario’s Peel Region grapples with urban sprawl

In Peel Region, west of Toronto, officials have adopted a plan to expand urban development to accommodate a growing population, putting them at odds with advocates who argue for the need to conserve green spaces.

Earth's oceans were the hottest, most acidic on record in 2021, UN report finds

The world's oceans grew to their warmest and most acidic levels on record last year, the World Meteorological Organization said on Wednesday, as United Nations officials warned that war in Ukraine threatened global climate commitments.
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Six months since the B.C. floods; International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia 2022

Six months ago today, floods ravaged parts of the Fraser Valley. Today, we're looking back on those events, and the short- and long-term impacts of climate change on B.C. producers. In our second half, it's the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia 2022. We're talking to Elizabeth Saewyc, Executive Director of the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre, and Alex Sangha, founder of Sher Vancouver, a support service for LGBTQ+ South Asians and their friends, families, and allies.
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How long will Canada’s glaciers last?

Climate change is having a huge impact on Canada’s Rocky Mountain glaciers, and scientists say we have already passed the tipping point. Meteorologist Christy Climenhaga travelled to the Athabasca Glacier, the focal point of the Icefields Parkway, to learn more about the rapid glacial recession and what it will mean for Canada’s future.
Ask CBC News

How accessible are EV charging stations across Canada?

How many electric vehicle charging stations are in Canada? How many would it take to support a country full of EVs? How long do they take to charge? Here's what you wanted to know.
Audio

Ontario's Green party releases its plans for northern Ontario

This has been quite the week for the provincial election campaign in northern Ontario with the northern leaders debate, and northern platforms being rolled out. The Green Party just released its plan for the north. We spoke about the new northern platform with Green party leader Mike Schreiner.
Audio

Thousands of Canadians still waiting in queue for surgeries; how desalination could solve the growing water crisis; architecture critic Alex Bozikovic on Canada’s lost buildings and the memories within them

As soon as the pandemic hit, the world of medicine shifted its focus. That meant surgeries that weren’t deemed life-threatening were put on hold. Today, thousands of Canadians are still waiting for their turn to come. Matt Galloway speaks with Amber Nurse and Linda Kroeker, who are both waiting for knee surgery; and Dr. David Urbach, the head of the department of surgery at Women's College Hospital. Then, the southwestern United States is in the grips of a historic drought — and now, one of the country’s biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead, has seen its water levels plummet. It’s the result of a two-decades-long dry spell fuelled by climate change. John Fleck, a professor of water policy and governance at the University of New Mexico, talks about the importance of Lake Mead; and Peter Fiske, director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation and the Water-Energy Resilience Institute, explains why desalination could solve the growing water crisis. And in his new book, 305 Lost Buildings of Canada, architecture critic Alex Bozikovic explores some of Canada’s greatest lost buildings — and the memories and stories that lived within them.
Audio

How desalination could solve the growing water crisis

The southwestern United States is in the grips of a historic drought — and now, one of the country’s biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead, has seen its water levels plummet. It’s the result of a two-decades-long dry spell fuelled by climate change. John Fleck, a professor of water policy and governance at the University of New Mexico, talks about the importance of Lake Mead; and Peter Fiske, director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation and the Water-Energy Resilience Institute, explains why desalination could solve the growing water crisis.
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Quebec weighs call to pause all urban sprawl and highway expansions

A provincial climate-change committee that advises the Quebec government is making some bold recommendations, while the province's transport minister says he's focused on public transit.

World could see 1.5 C of warming in next 5 years, WMO reports

The world faces a 50 per cent chance of warming 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, if only briefly, by 2026, the World Meteorological Organization says.

Extreme weather events have strained farmers' mental health. But asking for help still a hurdle for many

Farmers in B.C. say the past year of extreme weather events has affected their mental health and are warning that many in the agricultural sector are reluctant to seek help when they need it. Some researchers are developing supports with the agricultural life in mind.
Analysis

What happens in India doesn't stay in India. Why this deadly heat wave has a wide reach

The persistent heat wave that has struck India over the past few weeks is leading to deaths, electricity shortages and uncertainty about crops and those impacts will likely not remain within its borders.

Europe's path away from Russian oil and toward renewable energy is paved with a dirty reality

As Europe vows to kick its reliance on Russian fossil fuels in response to Moscow's weaponization of its energy supply, climate advocates hope it could spur a more rapid transition to renewable energy. But experts say it won't happen overnight.
Q&A

Parts of India and Pakistan could become too hot for people to survive, warns scientist

If the world doesn't drastically reduce its carbon emissions, India and Pakistan will become too hot for people to live there, says climate scientist Chandni Singh.

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