Technology & Science·Audio

Why some Canadians want to die on Mars

More than 80,000 people have applied for a Dutch non-profit organization's proposed one-way trip to Mars. Anna Maria Tremonti, host of The Current, spoke to four Canadians — two Mars one applicants, a member of the Mars One team, and astronaut Julie Payette — about whether it's a good idea.

And why they maybe should think twice

Mars One began accepting online applications in April. It plans to send humans on a one-way trip to establish a permanent settlement on Mars in 2023.

Since the Dutch non-profit organization Mars One started inviting people to apply to take a one-way trip to Mars, more than 80,000 people have taken them up on the invitation, including dozens of Canadians.

Anna Maria Tremonti, host of The Current, spoke to four Canadians — two Mars One applicants, a member of the Mars One team and Canadian astronaut Julie Payette  — about whether it's a good idea.

  • Raine Light, 29, and Duane Zilm, 65, two B.C. residents who have applied to Mars One, shared the reasons why they are so willing to leave Earth behind for good and start a new life on the Red Planet.
  • Raye Cass, a professor of applied human sciences at Concordia University, who is in charge of developing the astronaut selection criteria for Mars One, explained why she agreed to take part in the project and described what qualities the program will look for among applicants.
  • Payette outlined why she thinks the Mars One mission won't succeed, including the many technical challenges that it will have to overcome.

Mars One began accepting online applications in April. It plans to send humans on a one-way trip to establish a permanent settlement on Mars in 2023.