Technology & Science

Solar Impulse 2 readies for Pacific Ocean crossing

A solar plane on a round-the-world flight is expected to take off on the longest leg of its journey — the crossing of the Pacific Ocean — as early as Tuesday.

Longest leg of round-the-world flight will take 5 days, 5 nights

The Solar Impulse 2 plane began its 35,000-kilometre journey in Abu Dhabi on March 9. It is expected to land back in Abu Dhabi in late July or August. (Associated Press)

A solar plane on a round-the-world flight is expected to take off on the longest leg of its journey — the crossing of the Pacific Ocean — as early as Tuesday.

The exact date of take-off will be announced online at www.solarimpulse.com.

When it does take off, the Solar Impulse 2 will depart some time after 4 p.m. ET from Nanjing, China, whenever weather conditions are favourable. The flight from China to Hawaii will take at least five days and five nights.

The plane began its 35,000-kilometre journey in Abu Dhabi on March 9. It is expected to land back in Abu Dhabi in late July or August.

The fuel-free aircraft is powered by more than 17,000 solar cells on its wings that recharge the plane's batteries, enabling it to fly during the day or night.

The plane's journey can be followed online at www.solarimpulse.com.

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