Technology & Science

Tiny new chameleon may be world's smallest reptile

Scientists say they have discovered a sunflower seed-sized subspecies of chameleon in Madagascar that may well be the smallest reptile on Earth.

Male nano-chameleons, found in Madagascar, are only 13.5 mm long; females are bigger

Scientists discover 'nano-chameleon'

World

3 months ago
0:42
Tiny subspecies found in Madagascar may be smallest reptile ever found. 0:42

Scientists say they have discovered a sunflower seed-sized subspecies of chameleon that may well be the smallest reptile on Earth.

Two of the miniature lizards, one male and one female, were discovered by a German-Madagascan expedition team in northern Madagascar.

The male Brookesia nana, or nano-chameleon, has a body that is only 13.5 mm (0.53 inches) long, making it the smallest of all the roughly 11,500 known species of reptiles, the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology in Munich said. Its total length from nose to tail is just under 22 mm (0.87 inch).

The female nano-chameleon is significantly larger, with an overall length of 29 mm, the research institute said, adding that the scientists were unable to find further specimens of the new subspecies "despite great effort."

The species' closest relative is the slightly larger Brookesia micra, whose discovery was announced in 2012.

Scientists assume that the lizard's habitat is small, as is the case for similar subspecies.

"The nano-chameleon's habitat has unfortunately been subject to deforestation, but the area was placed under protection recently, so the species will survive," Oliver Hawlitschek, a scientist at the Center of Natural History in Hamburg, said in a statement.

A description of the new chameleon was published in the journal Scientific Reports last week.

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