Technology & Science

The most famous black hole now has a name

When talking about the famous black hole whose photograph was released by scientists this week, you can now refer to it by a special name — Powehi.

Black hole at centre of galaxy M87 named Powehi, which means 'adorned fathomless dark creation'

This is the first image ever taken of the event horizon of a supermassive black hole, captured by the Event Horizon Telescope in 2017. The photograph was revealed earlier this week. (Event Horizon Telescope)

A language professor has given a Hawaiian name — Powehi — to the black hole depicted in an image produced in a landmark experiment.

University of Hawaii-Hilo Hawaiian professor Larry Kimura named the cosmic object, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Thursday.

The world's first image of a black hole revealed Wednesday was created using data from eight radio telescopes around the world.

Powehi means "the adorned fathomless dark creation" or "embellished dark source of unending creation" and comes from the Kumulipo, an 18th century Hawaiian creation chant. Po is a profound dark source of unending creation, while wehi, honoured with embellishments, is one of the chant's descriptions of po, the newspaper reported.

'Very meaningful'

"To have the privilege of giving a Hawaiian name to the very first scientific confirmation of a black hole is very meaningful to me and my Hawaiian lineage that comes from po," Kimura said in a news release.

A Hawaiian name was justified because the project included two Hawaii telescopes, astronomers said.

"As soon as he said it, I nearly fell off my chair," said Jessica Dempsey, deputy director of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea.

Dempsey was among 200 scientists who worked to capture an image of the massive black hole in the M87 galaxy nearly 54 million light-years from Earth.

Dempsey said Powehi is an excellent match for the scientific explanation provided to Kimura.

"We described what we had seen and that this black hole was illuminating and brightening the darkness around it, and that's when he came up with the name," she said.

The name Powehi isn't official yet — for it to be, it needs to be accepted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the organization in charge of assigning names to celestial bodies and their surface features.

However, the IAU has previously accepted another name that Kimura came up with: 'Oumuamua, now the official name of a strange, elongated comet from outside our solar system discovered in 2017.

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