Technology & Science

New sphinx statue uncovered by Egyptian archeologists

Egyptian archaeologists draining water from a temple in the southern city of Aswan have uncovered a sandstone sphinx likely dating to the Ptolemaic era.

Mythical being with a human head and a lion's body was discovered at the Kom Ombo temple

This photo released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities shows the latest discovery of a statue of a sphinx the Temple of Kom Ombo in Aswan, Egypt. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via Associated Press)

Egyptian archaeologists draining water from a temple in the southern city of Aswan have uncovered a sandstone sphinx likely dating to the Ptolemaic era, the antiquities ministry said on Sunday.

The sphinx, a mythical being with the head of a human and the body of a lion, was discovered at the Kom Ombo temple, where two engraved sandstone reliefs of King Ptolemy V had also recently been found, the ministry said in statement.

Ptolemaic rule spanned about three centuries until the Roman conquest in 30 BC.

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