Bob McDonald

Bob McDonald is the host of CBC Radio's award-winning weekly science program, Quirks & Quarks. He is also a science commentator for CBC News Network and CBC-TV's The National. He has received 12 honorary degrees and is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Latest from Bob McDonald

Analysis

It's critical to detect life on Mars before humans set foot on the red planet

Bob McDonald's blog: how we can avoid accidental microbiological 'wars of the worlds'
Analysis

Getting to Mars is a shooting gallery where all targets are moving

Bob McDonald's blog: Given the precision that's required, it's no wonder roughly half of Mars missions fail.
Analysis

Scientists develop transparent wood that is stronger and lighter than glass

Bob McDonald's blog: A simple backyard procedure results in see-through wood with enormous potential as a building material.
Analysis

The latest self-portrait in a gallery of Earth photos taken from space

Bob McDonald's blog: The Solar Orbiter captured images of Earth, Venus and Mars together in a single frame
Analysis

It's no yolk — egghead experiment simulates concussion

Bob McDonald's blog: Researchers discovered it was the sudden stopping of rotational forces that could do the most damage
Analysis

Robotic dogs and fish could help explore deeper into other worlds

Bob McDonald's blog: Robotic animals could boldly go where wheeled rovers can't
Analysis

Apollo landing sites now protected by U.S. law, but what about the flags?

Bob McDonald's blog: Fading flags open the question of how to preserve the legacy of the landings.
Analysis

COVID-19 in 2020 showed science and society in action

Bob McDonald's blog: The pandemic gave rise to unprecedented global scientific cooperation to combat the greatest health threat of our lives. Here's a look back at how it all unfolded. 
Analysis

An encounter with the real stuff

Bob McDonald's blog: Meeting the test pilot legend Chuck Yeager, who died this week.
Analysis

New 3D map of the Milky Way continues a quest that began in Canada

Bob McDonald's blog: The map includes data from more than 1.8 billion stars

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