Check out the world's 1st web page, from 25 years ago, on Internaut Day

What did web pages look like 25 years ago? Well, there was only one, and why not celebrate Internaut Day today by checking it out?

Official launch of World Wide Web to the public on Aug. 23, 1991, named 'Internaut Day'

A 1992 version of the website for the W3 project can be viewed online at http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html
The first web page was created by Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist at CERN, seen in a 2013 photo. (Jean-Christophe Bott, Keystone/Associated Press)

What did web pages look like 25 years ago? Well, 25 years ago today, there was only one that the public could see — the very first.

And it wasn't much more than a few pages of text with some hyperlinks — describing what the World Wide Web was envisioned to be.

The first web page was originally hosted on this NeXT workstation, shown here as displayed in 2005 at Microcosm, the public science museum at CERN. (Wikimedia Commons)

The first web page was created by Tim-Berners Lee, a British scientist at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, located on the French-Swiss border near Geneva. The page went live at CERN on Dec. 20, 1990, and was opened up to the high-energy physics community on Jan. 10, 1991. But it wasn't until August of that year that Berners-Lee made the project public by posting a summary of it on several online forums, lastly on Aug. 22.

Some time later, Aug. 23, 1991, was named "Internaut Day," which is now celebrated annually to recognize the launch of the World Wide Web ... although Berners-Lee is not sure why that date was chosen.

He thinks of the birth of the World Wide Web as happening on March 12, 1989, the date he first proposed a "distributed information system at CERN" that would later become something much bigger.

In 2013, CERN restored the first website to how it looked in 1992.

Berners-Lee later developed a working prototype web server and browser on a powerful computer made by NeXT inc., a company started by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

The first web page was originally hosted on Berners-Lee's computer, which is still at CERN, but no longer online.

Before the World Wide Web, other protocols existed for transferring information over the internet, but the web quickly surpassed them in popularity.

Corrections

  • An earlier headline on this story suggested incorrectly that Aug. 23 was the anniversary of the first internet page. In fact, it is reportedly the anniversary of the first web page being 'made public.'
    Aug 23, 2016 12:29 PM ET