Politics

Trudeau, first ministers meet Monday ahead of UN climate talks

Climate change will be a hot topic tomorrow when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets in Ottawa with the premiers and territorial leaders.

Meeting will be 1st formal sit-down of its kind since 2009

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a news conference in Ottawa Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 as he prepares to participate in a series of international summits on climate change, security and the global economy. (Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press)

Sensing a meaningful change in attitude in Ottawa, a number of Canada's premiers say they're looking forward to meeting tomorrow with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

The focus of the meeting will be on climate change.

Trudeau is hoping to reach agreement with his provincial and territorial counterparts on a national plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions before he heads to a major international climate change summit in Paris.

The United Nations climate conference, known as COP21, begins Nov. 30 and the goal is to achieve a framework agreement on reducing emissions among all countries in the world.

B.C. Premier Christy Clark has said she expects the leaders will work on a national climate strategy in advance of the talks in Paris. Clark said she will be touting B.C.'s carbon tax, which she calls a world-leading weapon against global warming.

The premiers will also discuss how both levels of government can work in concert with municipalities to bring in refugees from the crisis engulfing Syria and northern Iraq.

Trudeau has maintained a campaign commitment to transport and house 25,000 refugees before year's end.

Tomorrow's meeting in Ottawa will be the first formal sit-down of premiers with the prime minister since 2009.

Former prime minister Stephen Harper preferred to deal one on one with each premier rather than face them all at once.

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