Politics

Sunday Scrum: Care home deaths put spotlight on elder care in Canada

CBC News Network's Sunday Scrum panel is your destination for frank discussion and analysis of the week's big Canadian political stories. This week: Our panellists discuss deaths at a private Montreal-area seniors' residence and what that says about the state of elder care in Canada.

Catch up on all the discussions from the Sunday Scrum here

Police and the coroner's office are investigating a private seniors' home in Dorval, Que., after 31 residents at the facility died in less than one month. (Ivanoh Demers/Radio-Canada)

CBC News Network's Sunday Scrum panel is your destination for frank discussion and analysis of the week's big Canadian political stories.

This week, our panellists talk about 31 deaths — some linked to COVID-19 — at a private Montreal-area seniors' residence and what that says about elder care in Canada. Plus, a discussion about briefing notes prepared for federal ministers that reveal Canada's slow start at heading off the impact of the pandemic.

As well, the panellists take on another round of viewer questions this week regarding the coronavirus pandemic. 

Watch the clips below.

WATCH: Long-term care home deaths put spotlight on elder care in Canada:

Quebec Premier François Legault said the 31 deaths at a private Montreal-area seniors' residence since March 13 — five, so far, confirmed from COVID-19  — look 'a lot like major negligence.' 12:47

WATCH: A slow start to Canada's COVID-19 response:

Briefing notes prepared by bureaucrats for federal ministers show that public health officials stated the risk of transmission in Canada was low right up until early March, only to recommend an ordered shutdown of economic life in this country some two weeks later. 11:05

WATCH: Viewer questions on COVID-19:

Back by popular demand, our political panel takes more of your questions regarding the coronavirus pandemic in Canada and the government's response. 16:15

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