Politics

Stephen Harper the consultant: Former PM creates new company

According to documents posted on the Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada website, Stephen Harper has set up his own company, called Harper & Associates Consulting Inc.

Former prime minister sets up his own company with former staffers

Outgoing prime minister Stephen Harper arrives at his Langevin office in Ottawa, two days after his defeat in the Oct. 19 election. Harper is expected to step down as an MP after the House rises for its summer break. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Stephen Harper may still be a member of Parliament, but the former prime minister has already taken steps to launch a new career.

According to documents filed with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Harper has created his own corporation.

Called "Harper & Associates Consulting Inc.," the paperwork was officially filed with the government in late December of 2015, two months after his party's election defeat and his resignation as leader.

Harper is listed as a director, along with former PMO staffers Ray Novak and Jeremy Hunt.

Stephen Harper talks to his chief of staff Ray Novak as he makes an election campaign stop at the shipyards in North Vancouver, B.C. in August, 2015. Novak is listed as a director of Harper's new company, Harper & Associates Consulting Inc. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Novak once served as Harper's chief of staff, and has remained one of his closest advisers. Novak's name came up repeatedly during the 2015 election campaign, as reporters asked the Conservative leader about Novak's knowledge of the Mike Duffy senate expense scandal following testimony at Duffy's trial.

Hunt is also one of Harper's long-time confidants, holding several different roles within the former prime minister's office.

Harper is expected to resign from political life by the fall. He will be honoured tonight in Vancouver, during the opening of the Conservative party convention.

Although Harper is not expected to address his future in detail this evening, his short speech will likely touch upon free trade, which he hopes will become his political legacy.

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