Politics

Stuck in South Africa, new travel rules put this Canadian's trip home for the holidays at risk

Andrew Neumann has been trying to leave South Africa, where he's lived since 2015, to return home to Canada to see his family for the holidays. But confusing, overlapping travel restrictions have meant he's been so far unable to leave the country.

Andrew Neumann 'somewhat hopeful' that a flight next week could bring him home

Passengers check in at the Lufthansa counter at Johannesburg's O.R. Tambo International Airport on Monday. (Jerome Delay/The Associated Press)

UPDATE: The federal government has amended its rules for Canadians and permanent Canadian residents travelling here from South Africa. It includes a "temporary exemption" from the more strict restrictions detailed in the article below. The temporary exemption requires Canadians and permanent Canadian residents: 

  • Obtain a pre-departure negative COVID-19 molecular test from an accredited South African laboratory 48 hours before departure.
  • Fly from Johannesburg or Cape Town to Frankfurt, Germany, on a Lufthansa flight.
  • Transit through Frankfurt airport to travel on a direct Lufthansa or Air Canada flight to Canada.

Andrew Neumann's hopes of making it home for the holidays have been cast into doubt by the emergence of the omicron coronavirus variant and the swift implementation of new pandemic border restrictions around the world.

"It's actually a particularly sensitive time," Neumann, a Canadian living in South Africa, said in an interview on CBC's The House that aired Saturday. His son just started university in Toronto, his first year away from home, he explained. And there are other pressing concerns.

"My wife's father is very ill. He's in his 80s. He's undergoing chemotherapy.... Likewise, my mother's 91. She's in sort of cognitive decline. I haven't seen her in two years," he told host Chris Hall.

"And there's a question mark again in my mind: Am I going to be able to say goodbye?" Neumann said.

Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino discusses new restrictions and testing measures at the border and Peel Region medical officer of health Dr. Lawrence Loh explains how his jurisdiction is dealing with concerns about omicron. 20:23

Neumann has lived in Johannesburg since 2015. He was planning to return to Canada for the holidays when new travel restrictions were put in place affecting travellers from 10 countries, mostly in southern Africa. Canadians trying to come home from those countries must now meet a series of additional testing and quarantine requirements.

Travellers must get a pre-departure molecular COVID-19 test 72 hours ahead of their departure, something Canadians are now used to, but that test must be in a third country — not any of the 10 on Canada's list. Neumann was planning to get a test during his connection in Germany, but additional rules put in place there have made that impossible.

Canadian, German restrictions clash

A letter Neumann received from the Canadian High Commission in South Africa said German airline Lufthansa would not allow Canadians to board because of that third-country testing requirement and restrictions put in place by Germany.

Neumann's situation closely resembles that of the Canadian junior women's field hockey team, which has also been stuck in South Africa. The team has asked for an exemption to leave the country.

Andrew Neumann and his family have been trying to come back to Canada from South Africa. (Submitted)

Neumann said he has been struck by what he says is the "cavalier" way the government has answered the questions of would-be travellers whose plans the restrictions have thrown into limbo.

He also says the restrictions themselves make little sense given what we now know about the spread of the omicron variant.

"It just seems so disproportionate a response to southern Africa versus the rest of the world that you have to question the motivations," he said.

In an emailed response to CBC News, Global Affairs Canada said this country's entry requirements are meant to ensure the safety of Canadians. It said that the implementation of restrictions could disrupt travel plans but that "the decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the individual."

"We can confirm that we are receiving reports of Canadians abroad affected by these new measures," the statement said.

Debate over travel ban effectiveness

In a separate interview on The House, Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino said the restrictions are being implemented to give Canada the time to assess the risk of the omicron variant and "protect the progress" the country has made against the pandemic.

"I'd acknowledge that we're at a moment where there will be some challenges, but we put in place public health measures because of the variant of concern."

WATCH | New travel restrictions throw travel plans into chaos: 

Omicron variant renews uncertainty for travellers

2 months ago
Duration 2:04
The uncertainty around the omicron variant and new COVID-19 testing and isolation requirements has some wondering if international travel is about to be upended again. 2:04

There has been significant criticism of the travel measures put in place by Canada and other countries, with growing evidence that the new variant had been circulating in several nations before South African researchers first discovered it in late November and travel restrictions were imposed.

Part of the debate has centred on the efficacy of travel restrictions themselves, with some experts arguing they do little to stop the spread of a new variant. The president of South Africa called them "unscientific" and "discriminatory."

Mendicino said the restrictions on the 10 countries were not politically motivated but instead based on science.

"We're doing it because we want to protect Canadians. This is not their first go-around. We've done this drill before, and we want to make sure that we're taking the right decision when it comes to protecting the health and safety of Canadians," he said.

WATCH | Debate over the effectiveness of travel restrictions: 

Travel bans unfairly target country that identified omicron variant, specialist says

2 months ago
Duration 7:52
Dr. Samir Gupta, a respirologist and associate professor at the University of Toronto, says travel bans to prevent the omicron variant's spread can buy time, but penalize the countries that identify new virus variants. 7:52

For one medical officer of health in Canada, the bans are of some use but should not be the focus of government.

"You know, the honest truth is that it probably would have limited impact overall, but it may help to slow the introduction of omicron," said Dr. Lawrence Loh of Peel Region, which hosts Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

For Neumann, it's clear the travel bans are not justified.

"When we know now that it's also everywhere else in the world suggests that poorer countries are at a disadvantage, certainly versus Europe and Canada and the U.S.," he said.

Despite the challenges so far, Neumann now has a flight booked for next Friday and describes himself as "somewhat hopeful" his travel plans will work out.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Christian Paas-Lang

Associate Producer

Christian Paas-Lang is an Associate Producer with The House and digital writer with CBC Politics.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now