Politics

Seriously injured soldiers would get up to $70,000 from new payment

CBC News has learned the Conservative government will announce new legislation Monday that will create a new payment worth up to $70,000 for seriously injured soldiers.

New Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O'Toole has introduced several new benefits this month

New benefits for wounded veterans

7 years ago
2:01
Seriously injured soldiers would get up to $70,000 from new payment 2:01

CBC News has learned the Conservative government will announce legislation Monday that will create a new payment worth up to $70,000 for soldiers who have been seriously injured in the service of their country. 

The new benefit will apply only to the most seriously wounded soldiers, but will also be applied retroactively.

This change is yet another action taken by the government in recent weeks to improve the suite of benefits available to Canadian veterans.

New Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O'Toole, who took over from Julian Fantino in January, has travelled the country promising veteran amputees they won't have to verify lost limbs, expanding benefits for reservists and grants for "informal caregivers" of injured veterans to hire help.

However, neither the new award nor any of the other changes address the key complaint of veterans: the loss of monthly pensions as a benefit for all wounded vets under the New Veterans Charter introduced in 2006.

The official government notice paper dated Friday said O'Toole will announce “An Act to amend the Canadian Forces Members and Veterans Re-establishment and Compensation Act and to make consequential amendments to another Act.”

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now