Politics

Food agency taking steps to prevent entry of lettuce suspected in E. coli cases

The federal government is advising the food industry not to import romaine lettuce from areas in the U.S. suspected of producing lettuce contaminated with E. coli.

3 more cases of E. coli were confirmed in Ontario and Quebec last week

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it is continuing its own investigation into several E. coli cases linked to the romaine lettuce, and is sharing its findings with its American counterparts. (Jessie Wardarski/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via the Associated Press)

The federal government is advising the food industry not to import romaine lettuce from areas in the U.S. suspected of producing lettuce contaminated with E. coli.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it will also take steps to make sure products from areas identified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are not being allowed into Canada.

The measures come after the FDA said it suspects romaine lettuce harvested in parts of California this month is the source of an outbreak of E. coli O157 that has made people sick in both Canada and the States.

The agency says it is continuing its own investigation into several E. coli cases linked to the romaine lettuce, and is sharing its findings with its American counterparts.

Three more cases of E. coli were confirmed in Ontario and Quebec last week, bringing the total number since mid-October to 22, with at least one case in New Brunswick.

At this time, there have been no changes to the public health advice for Canadians. The Public Health Agency of Canada has advised those in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick to avoid eating romaine lettuce and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce until more is known about the outbreak.

Residents in those impacted provinces are also advised to discard any romaine lettuce in their home, and to properly wash and sanitize any containers or bins that have come in contact with romaine lettuce.

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