Politics·PODCAST

The Pollcast: The Bernier Bombshell

On the latest episode of the Pollcast, the CBCs' J.P. Tasker discusses the Conservative policy convention in Halifax and the impact of Maxime Bernier's split from the party while Jacques Poitras reports from the campaign trail on the New Brunswick provincial election.

The impact of Maxime Bernier's split and how the first week of the New Brunswick election campaign went down

Maxime Bernier announced last week that he was leaving the Conservative Party and would launch his own party to contest the 2019 federal election. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The Conservatives have a problem on their hands, and his name is Maxime Bernier. But just how much of a negative impact he will have on the party's chances in the 2019 federal election remains to be seen. 

On the first day of the Conservatives' policy convention in Halifax last week, Bernier dropped a bombshell when he announced he was leaving the party and would start his own, calling the party he nearly came to lead "intellectually and morally corrupt."

The CBC's John Paul Tasker was in Halifax to cover the convention, and joins Pollcast host Éric Grenier to discuss the fallout of Bernier's announcement, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer's speech to members and the policy votes and debates that followed.

Jacques Poitras, the CBC's provincial affairs reporter in New Brunswick, then breaks down the first week of the New Brunswick provincial election campaign, including the introduction of the federal carbon tax issue into the campaign, the cancelling of the French-language leaders' debate and the potential electoral impact of the smaller parties in the race.

J.P. Tasker discusses the Conservative policy convention in Halifax and the impact of Maxime Bernier's split from the party, and Jacques Poitras reports from the campaign trail in the New Brunswick provincial election. 33:57

Listen to the full discussion above — or subscribe to the CBC Pollcast and listen to past episodes of the show.

Follow Éric Grenier, John Paul Tasker and Jacques Poitras on Twitter.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.