Politics

Trudeau and Pelosi place bet on NBA championship

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ​​​​​​​have placed a friendly wager with one another over which team will the National Basketball Association Championship — the Toronto Raptors or the Golden State Warriors.

'The Raptors are making history and they aren't done yet,' Trudeau says

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught up with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi last week on Juno Beach, where the pair took part in marking the 75th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. They were accompanied by French Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, second from left, and French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, right. (Fred Tanneau/Associated Press)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have placed a friendly wager over which team will win the National Basketball Association championship — the Toronto Raptors or the Golden State Warriors.

The winner gets a selection of delicacies from the loser's home region.

According to a statement from the Prime Minister's Office, if the Raptors win, Trudeau gets a basket of goodies from Pelosi's home state: Ghirardelli chocolate from San Francisco, California wine and a selection of almonds and walnuts.

"The Raptors are making history and they aren't done yet.  We're going all the way, Canada. Ghirardelli chocolates and a glass of California wine are going to pair nicely with the Raptors' first NBA title," said Prime Minister Trudeau.

If Oakland's Golden State Warriors win, Pelosi gets a basket of locally-made goods chosen from across Canada.

"The only thing sweeter than watching Golden State once again become world champions is doing so while enjoying a selection of Canada's finest," said Pelosi.  "I am proud to be part of Dub Nation!"

The Raptors currently lead the best-of-seven series with the Golden State Warriors three games to one. Game five takes place tonight in Toronto.

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