Nexus trusted-traveller cards reinstated, at least for now, minister says

The federal public safety minister says revoked trusted-traveller Nexus border cards held by about 200 Canadian permanent residents have been reinstated, at least for now.

U.S. court ruling opens door for 200 Canadian card holders following Trump ban

Canada's Minister of Public Safety Ralph Goodale says Nexus border cards held by Canadian permanent residents have been reinstated, for now, following a U.S. court ruling that suspended Trump's immigration ban. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The federal public safety minister says revoked trusted-traveller Nexus border cards held by about 200 Canadian permanent residents have been reinstated, at least for now.

Ralph Goodale says the Nexus cards, which help people cross the border more swiftly, were cancelled a few days ago because a recent U.S. executive order on immigration made the holders ineligible.

The order banned travel to the U.S. by people from seven predominantly Muslim countries in the Middle East and Africa.

A U.S. court ruling suspended the order, opening the door to reinstatement of the Nexus cards. However, the White House has appealed the ruling, meaning the issue may be far from resolved.

Goodale told the House of Commons on Monday that no Canadian citizens were among the 200 people here who experienced the Nexus revocations.

CBC News reported last week that some of those affected were Canadian citizens or dual-citizens. One of those confirmed for CBC News on Wednesday that his Nexus status had been restored to "Approved."

Speaking to CBC News on Wednesday, Scott Bardsley, spokesperson for Goodale, told CBC News that there are a number of reasons why someone can have their Nexus card revoked, including providing false information or for violating a customs or immigration law. 

Bardsley maintained anyone who believes they have been wrongly affected can ask the U.S. Customs and Border Protection ombudsman to review their case, and that American officials should, in most cases, provide written reasoning for their decision.

As of December, there were almost 1.5 million members in the Nexus program — about 80 per cent of them Canadians.

with files from Shanifa Nasser