Politics

Canadian embassy commissions video touting NAFTA benefits

The Canadian embassy in Washington has commissioned and released a feel-good 82-second video "for advocacy purposes to highlight NAFTA's continued importance our shared economic prosperity."

Cost of project capped at $15,000 US

The Canadian embassy in Washington is paying up to $15,000 US for a video that “showcases just how critical NAFTA is for American workers," according to Ambassador David MacNaughton. (Stefan Ataman/Shutterstock)

The Canadian embassy in Washington has commissioned and released an 82-second video for American audiences touting the benefits of open trade.

The embassy decided to have the video made "for advocacy purposes to highlight NAFTA's continued importance (to) our shared economic prosperity," Global Affairs Canada spokesman John Babcock said in an email to CBC News.

According to public disclosure filings in the U.S., costs for the project were capped at $15,000 US.

The embassy hired Maryland-based LGND LLC to do the work.

The video will be used "on social media and at embassy and other events as negotiations to modernize NAFTA move forward," the production company said in recent filings required by American law to disclose work done for a foreign government.

"Funds may not be used for paid advertising, such as television commercials, but can support earned media options suggested by LGND."

'Earned media' is a term that refers to publicity generated through unpaid promotional efforts.

According to those U.S. filings, the contractor will push the video through digital and traditional channels for at least 30 days.

The company is required to later report back on those efforts and how effective they were.

The video launch "showcases just how critical NAFTA is for American workers, and how its modernization can help the U.S. succeed for another 25 years and beyond," David MacNaughton, Canada's ambassador to Washington, said in a statement.

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