Politics

New information commissioner fined for failing to disclose information

The woman whose job it is to safeguard Canada's freedom of information laws has been dinged for failing to disclose information to the ethics watchdog.

Caroline Maynard has now paid her fine in full

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau nominated Caroline Maynard as Canada's information commissioner earlier this year. (Government of Canada)

The woman whose job it is to safeguard Canada's freedom of information laws has been dinged for failing to disclose information to the ethics watchdog. 

In a notice posted Monday, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion reported that his office has fined Information Commissioner Caroline Maynard $250 for failing to disclose "a material change relating to assets" within 30 days.

Under the Conflict of Interest Act, reporting public office holders are required to submit a confidential report describing their assets, liabilities and income. If that changes, "reporting public office holders have 30 days in which to file a report," said spokesperson Alison Zinni in an email.

"Failure to do so may result in an administrative monetary penalty of up to $500."

Dion's office said Maynard paid the fine in full.

In an email to CBC News Maynard said she takes her "responsibilities as a reporting public office holder very seriously" and explained the details behind her fine.

"Specifically, this related to the purchase of RRSPs in the amount of approximately $5,000," she said. "When this was brought to my attention, I acknowledged the mistake and addressed the matter immediately. I have also taken steps with my financial advisor to ensure this does not happen again."

Maynard, a member of the Québec bar, took over the job in March 2018. Before that she was a government lawyer for more than 20 years.

When he first nominated her, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Maynard "has a deep appreciation of the need for an open and transparent government."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.