Politics

Manitoba may take second look at a carbon tax

Premier Brian Pallister joins CBC's The House to discuss the possibility that Manitoba could create a modified climate change plan that would include a carbon tax.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister says he is willing to create a modified climate change plan

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister speaks to reporters following a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during the Liberal Cabinet Retreat at the Fairmont Hotel in Winnipeg, on Jan. 20, 2020. (Mike Sudoma/The Canadian Press)

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister emerged from a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Monday, saying he's prepared to present a modified climate change plan that could include a carbon tax, but he wants the federal government to respect and recognize his province's record on environmental protection.

"We deserve to be respected for our green record. We do not deserve to be called climate change deniers by anybody," Pallister said after the meeting.

Manitoba's climate plan originally included a price on carbon, a flat tax of $25 per tonne.

But the federal government, who's own carbon tax will rise to $50 per tonne by 2022, said Manitoba's plan didn't go far enough.

In response, Pallister decided to scrap the carbon tax portion of his government's climate plan.

Now Pallister said he is willing to take a second look at a carbon tax — if the federal government shows some flexibility and acknowledges other efforts Manitoba has taken on the environment.

"If we're just going to continue to harangue each other about what the price on carbon should be instead of joining together and working on fighting climate change, we're missing the point," Pallister told CBC Radio's The House.

"The ball's a bit in the federal court here to demonstrate that there is some willingness to move on this," he said.

Premier Brian Pallister joins CBC's The House to discuss the possibility that Manitoba could create a modified climate change plan that would include a carbon tax. 7:54