Politics

Liberals begin national security review with release of discussion paper

The Liberal government will launch the public phase of its long-awaited national security review Thursday with the release of a discussion paper.

Review will deal with problems Liberals have identified with former Conservative anti terror law C-51

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the government is open to an expansive revamp of national security legislation and policy, not just the handful of promised changes. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The Liberal government will launch the public phase of its long-awaited national security review Thursday with the release of a discussion paper.

The government has promised to repeal what it calls the problematic elements of omnibus security legislation, known as Bill C-51, ushered in by the previous Conservative government.

The Liberals also plan to introduce new measures they say will do a better job of balancing collective security with rights and freedoms.

Among other things, the government has pledged to ensure all Canadian Security Intelligence Service warrants respect the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

This could roll back new provisions allowing CSIS to disrupt terror plots through tactics that breach the charter as long as a judge approves.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has said the government is open to an expansive revamp of national security legislation and policy, not just the handful of promised changes.

Goodale and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould are slated to discuss the consultation at a news conference Thursday in Edmonton.

They will release a discussion paper as well as a lengthy background document outlining national security issues.

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