PODCAST

The Pollcast: What do Canadians think of Justin Trudeau's plan for ISIS, refugees?

The Angus Reid Institute's Shachi Kurl joins Éric Grenier to discuss the findings of her latest poll, which shows that, by a two-to-one margin, Canadians believe that the bombing mission against ISIS in Iraq and Syria should be continued or increased.

Host Éric Grenier is joined by the Angus Reid Institute's Shachi Kurl

A Canadian Armed Forces CF-18 Fighter jet arrives at the Canadian Air Task Force Flight Operations Area in Kuwait. By a 2 to 1 margin, Canadians feel that the bombing mission against ISIS should be continued or increased. (Combat Camera/DND)

The CBC Pollcast, hosted by CBC poll analyst and ThreeHundredEight.com founder Éric Grenier, explores the world of political polls and the trends they show.

Joining Éric on today's podcast is the Angus Reid Institute's Senior Vice-President Shachi Kurl, who has new numbers on what Canadians think of the Liberals' plans to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada before year's end and to halt the bombing campaign against ISIS.

"When it comes to what to do about the mission," says Kurl, "two-thirds are actually opting for choices or answers that are not in line with the Trudeau government's plan to continue training but end the bombing missions." 

The polls suggest that a majority oppose the government's plan to resettle 25,000 refugees by Jan. 1 by a margin of 54 to 42 per cent, while 62 per cent of Canadians think that Canada should continue its current bombing mission of ISIS in Iraq and Syria, or even increase its scope.

You can listen to the full discussion below, or subscribe to The CBC Pollcast and listen to past episodes here.

The poll on refugees was conducted on November 16, interviewing 1,503 Canadians. The poll on the ISIS mission was conducted on November 18, interviewing 1,508 Canadians. As the polls were done online, margins of error do not apply.

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