Politics

Full text of the NDP motion on C-51

In response to the government's efforts to send the proposed anti-terror bill to committee, New Democrat public safety critic Randall Garrison proposed the following motion, which would, if adopted, see the House decline to proceed further with the legislation. Read the full text here.

Anti-terror bill 'asks Canadians to choose between their security and their freedoms'

NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair announced on Wednesday that his party would not support the government's proposed anti-terror measures. On Thursday, NDP public safety critic Randall Garrison put forward a motion to have the House reject the bill. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

In response to the government's efforts to ensure the proposed anti-terrorism bill makes its way to committee early next week, New Democrat public safety critic Randall Garrison proposed the following motion, which would, if adopted, see the House decline to proceed further with the legislation:

That the motion be amended by deleting all the words after the word “That” and substituting the following:
this House decline to give second reading to Bill C-51, An Act to enact the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act and the Secure Air Travel Act, to amend the Criminal Code, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts, because it:

a) threatens our way of life by asking Canadians to choose between their security and their freedoms;

b) was not developed in consultation with other parties, all of whom recognize the real threat of terrorism and support effective, concrete measures to keep Canadians safe;

c) irresponsibly provides CSIS with a sweeping new mandate without equally increasing oversight;

d) contains definitions that are broad, vague and threaten to lump legitimate dissent together with terrorism; and

e) does not include the type of concrete, effective measures that have been proven to work, such as working with communities ‎on measures to counter radicalization of youth.

Under the Standing Orders, a "reasoned amendment" like the above is one of the very few motions that can be put forward at second reading. It will be put to a vote on Monday evening, just before the House votes on the main bill. 

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