Politics

MPs hold emergency debate to respond to Wilson-Raybould's testimony

There was an emergency debate in the House of Commons Thursday night on the subject of former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould’s testimony before the justice committee.

'Somebody is lying, and I would say that it is not the former attorney general': Conservative House leader

Former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould gave testimony about the SNC-Lavalin affair before a justice committee hearing on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. (Lars Hagberg/AFP/Getty Images)

There was an emergency debate in the House of Commons Thursday night on the subject of former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould's testimony before the justice committee.

Conservative House leader Candice Bergen asked for the debate early Thursday, a request that was supported by the NDP.

"Somebody is lying, and I would say that it is not the former attorney general," Bergen said.

Emergency debates are held to discuss urgent matters and must take place on the day the request is approved unless the Speaker rules otherwise.

The debate, which lasted until midnight, came as the NDP and the Greens continued a push for the government to call a public inquiry into allegations made by Wilson-Raybould that she is improperly pressured by 11 Prime Minister's Office and other government officials in the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Wilson-Raybould told the committee that she experienced sustained and improper pressure to allow the Quebec-based infrastructure company to avoid a trial on bribery charges through a deferred prosecution agreement.

The corporation faced a 10-year ban on bidding on government contracts if convicted of the criminal charges of bribery.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, meanwhile, continues to call for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to step down over the affair.

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