Politics

Canada to contribute $485M to help developing countries cope with COVID-19

Canada is providing $485 million to help developing countries cope with COVID-19, including therapies to limit deaths and ease the burden on strained health-care systems.

Funding will support international efforts to aid vulnerable populations around the globe

International Development Minister Karina Gould announced today that Canada is contributing another $485 million to help developing countries cope with COVID-19. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

Canada is providing $485 million to help developing countries cope with COVID-19, including therapies to limit deaths and ease the burden on strained health-care systems.

International Development Minister Karina Gould and Public Services and Procurement Minister Anita Anand announced the funding during a news conference in Ottawa today.

"The faster we can get tests, treatments and vaccines out to people, the sooner this pandemic can be contained. Canada's support of global efforts to find successful medical solutions is a win for all," Gould said in a prepared statement.

In the funding announced today, $230 million will target the procurement of treatments, allowing UNICEF to buy three million courses of COVID-19 antibody therapeutics after clinical trials and regulatory approvals are completed.

The other $255 million will go to Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, a coalition of international organizations and countries that is overseeing the development, production and equitable distribution of affordable COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics. 

WATCH / International Development Minister Karina Gould on COVID-19 aid:

Canada to contribute $230 million for COVID 19 therapies to developing countries

Politics News

3 months ago
0:45
Minister Karina Gould says Canada is responding to urgent needs identified by ACT Accelerator. 0:45

Today's announcement brings Canada's total contribution to ACT Accelerator to $865 million.

Canada's contribution could also help train front-line health-care workers to administer COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics, to plan and execute mass vaccination campaigns and to procure supplies essential to the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines and treatments, such as syringes or personal protective equipment.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now